B

 

Using Multiple Means of Engagement to Cultivate Classroom Communities

Emily Bailey - Towson University

 

This session employs the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principle of multiple means of engagement to consider intentional student roles in building classroom communities.

 

Abstract: Pedagogical theorist Étienne Wenger defines classroom communities as “groups of people who share a concern or a passion for something they do, and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly.” This session builds on his model, applying it to the goals of interest, intentionally, and improvement in the construction of classroom communities through Universal Design for Learning (UDL) multiple means of engagement. With an emphasis on creating meaningful learning experiences, the skills of effective cooperation and communication are considered in activities like concept mapping and small group collaboration.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify “user-centered” approaches to communal classroom learning. (2) Employ Universal Design for Learning (UDL) multiple means of engagement to make classroom experiences accessible to diverse learners. (3) Create significant learning experiences that contribute to the formation of effective classroom communities.

 

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners

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Can We Can We Foster Student Motivation for Learning?

Spencer Benson - Eii-Consulting & University of Maryland

 

In this session we will address recent findings regarding student motivation and whether specific teaching and learning approaches can foster student motivation to learn.

 

Abstract: Faculty often ask, “How can I motivate my students to learn?” Perhaps the best answer is “it depends” since motivation is a complex human characteristic that is affected by external and internal factors. In other words, an individual’s motivation has both intrinsic and extrinsic components that are influenced by personal, cultural and situational components. In this session we will address recent findings regarding student motivation and whether specific teaching and learning approaches can foster student motivation to learn. Participants are encouraged to come with questions, ideas and approaches that they have tried or are thinking about, which affect student motivation.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe cultural and situational factors that affect student motivation. (2) Articulate the roles intrinsic and extrinsic motivation play in fostering student learning. (3) Develop a teaching modification that will increase student motivation.

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Engaging and Motivating Students

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Using Big Questions to Design Authentic Assignments for Empowered Learners

Daneen Bergland - Portland State University

 

An interactive session using backward course design to develop assignments that serve a purpose beyond assessment, engage students in communities, and empower 21st century problem-solvers.

 

Abstract: Educators must ask big questions in the face of rapidly evolving problems such as, what does a person in the 21st century need to know or be able to do? How do our assignments engage and empower students in solving real-world problems? These “Big Questions” can guide our design of assignments relevant and practical to students, employers, and society. Using the framework of backward course design and the concept of authentic assignments, participants will consider four categories of Big Questions to imagine assignments for their own classes that serve a purpose beyond assessment and empower students as engaged problem-solvers.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Apply backward course design to develop a culminating assignment. (2) Consider answers to four categories of “Big Questions” to help them design authentic, meaningful, and engaging assignments. (3) Develop a new, flexible, culminating assignment that serves a purpose in addition to assessment.

 

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign

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Improving Student Engagement Through Questioning, Reading, Collaboration, and Response

Shawn Bielicki - Liberty University

 

This interactive practice session will share, model, demonstrate, and discuss various teaching strategies that can lead to increased student engagement through questioning technique, active reading tactics, peer collaboration, and student participative responses.

 

Abstract: Student engagement refers to a number of modes of instruction that focuses the liability of learning on the learners. In essence, learners are actively engaged in the learning process. When done well, students become an important part of a given class and remain engaged throughout the session. The outcome is higher student achievement. This interactive practice session will share, model, demonstrate, and discuss various strategies to increase student engagement in large enrollment classes through questioning technique, active reading tactics, and student participative responses.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Recognize the importance of higher-end questioning in student assessments. (2) Implement a strategy for teaching students to actively read and engage with the text. (3) Increase student participation through various participative response techniques.

 

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students

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Online MBA Transition: Challenges and Lessons Learned after Five Years

Marlene Biseda - Pepperdine University

 

After teaching strategy for five years in an online MBA program, presenter discusses experiences and lessons learned, including challenges transitioning from on ground to online.

 

Abstract: The Pepperdine Graziadio Business School developed an online Masters of Business (MBA) program for working professionals. The presenter taught the capstone strategy course, including a business simulation, since its inception. Based on five years of teaching in online and on ground programs, the professor presents three change initiatives: developing policies and standards, implementing a virtual business simulation, and designing an interactive student exercise. She discusses her experience and the lessons learned including: (1) challenges in transitioning from an on ground to online format (2) implementation issues and resolutions, and (3) lessons learned relating to people, policy, process, and technology.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Explain the challenges in online teaching and course design. (2) Summarize implementation issues and identify potential resolutions when teaching online. (3) Develop standards for online teaching and learning, including people, policy, process, and technology.

 

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Online Learning and Teaching

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How Learning-Centered Teaching Can Make Research Methods/Design Courses Successful

Phyllis Blumberg - University of the Sciences

 

Participants will begin designing their research course using learning-centered practices, resulting in students becoming competent consumers of research or research designers.

 

Abstract: When faculty use many learning-centered teaching practices in research methods courses, they foster students’ competence as consumers of research or research designers. Participants will consider the evidence, coming from literature, on how to plan courses to achieve learning outcomes that fit the level of the course, how to teach students research skills, appropriate teaching and learning activities, and assessment methods to design better research courses. Participants will use two learning-centered practices to begin to design their research course: 1. crafting appropriate learning outcomes through backwards design, and 2. planning scaffolding for the development of research skills.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Adapt various evidence-based learning-centered practices to foster student research skill competency. (2) Craft an appropriate learning outcome for their undergraduate, graduate or professional research methods/design course. (3) Plan how to scaffold the development of research skills to allow students to be competent consumers of research or research designers.

 

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign

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Innovation in Academic Success: Embedding Critical Thinking Components in FYE Courses

Ndala Booker - AdventHealth University

 

A proactive method for enhancing retention and attrition is teaching a practical, meta-cognitive method of critical thinking to first year students.

 

Abstract: In anticipation of the ever-growing challenges related to retention and attrition, there is an ever growing number of instructors who are interested in powerful, innovative strategies that enhance retention while also boosting student success. With real life examples, related information and insights, Dr. Ndala Booker shares an innovative pedagogical approach of adding critical thinking components into First Year Experience courses.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand how teaching students a meta-cognitive method of critical thinking can enhance academic success. (2) Embed practical critical thinking components into their curriculum, no matter what the discipline. (3) Teach students an innovative method of how to think critically in any subject area.

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Teaching Practical Writing Skills to Chemistry Majors

Lorae Bowden and Jared Bowden - Western Governor's University and Brigham Young University - Idaho

 

Case study of a needs analysis, course redesign, and results aimed to help chemistry students better learn practical workplace and lab communication skills for industry.

 

Abstract: An instructional redesign of course outcomes was undertaken to align content learning with relevant skill-based knowledge for a chemistry technical writing course. Students and professors participated in quantitative and qualitative assessments to determine outcome improvement. Data analysis of pre/post-tests suggest statistically significant learning gains in newly incorporated learning modules. Students perceived value and learning in the new skills. Professors reported that the new content was valuable and aligned with program outcomes for all graduates. It was concluded that the new course content is effective in teaching career-related writing skills, thus positively impacting student readiness for career success.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Explain the value of a needs analysis in university courses that prepare students for jobs. (2) Identify an area in their own field that could benefit from industry collaboration. (3) Formulate a plan for collaborating with industry in their field on a topic that can help better prepare students for working in that industry.

 

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students

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Assessing Infographics as an Alternative to Text-Based Assignments

Michael Buckholt, Jill Rulfs, and Kim LeChasseur - Worcester Polytechnic Institute

 

Visual literacy is a critical skill. We describe our use of infographic assignments, provide new teaching tools, and relate the challenges and successes of implementation.

 

Abstract: Visual literacy is a critical 21st century skill that has received increased attention in accreditation and best practices for college teaching and learning. Yet few students outside of communications and related programs take courses that focus on developing visual literacy skills. To address this need for visual literacy while covering content, we have integrated infographic assignments into our courses. We will introduce two types of assignments, describe rubric development for assessment, and guide participants in applying a rubric on example infographics. We will provide findings on the effectiveness of infographics as a mode of teaching and learning visual literacy skills.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand the current demand for visual literacy skills in post-secondary education. (2) Compare the benefits and drawbacks of substituting an infographic assignment in place of a narrative-based learning activity, such as a lab report or reading summary. (3) Apply a set of rubrics to student-generated infographics.

 

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Creating an Inclusive Climate in Your Online Learning Environment

Virginia Byrne and Louisa Nkrumah - University of Maryland College Park

 

During this hands-on workshop, we will work through how to foster an inclusive climate for students to engage in meaningful dialogue.

 

Abstract: When teaching and learning moves online, having meaningful class conversations can become more challenging - particularly when students are asked to share their ideas, opinions, or disagreements. Research has shown that this is especially true for Students of Color and other marginalized groups. During this hands-on workshop, we will work through how to foster inclusive climate for students to engage in meaningful dialogue.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Articulate the importance of fostering an inclusive climate online. (2) Identify online teaching practices for fostering an inclusive climate. (3) Develop a plan for how to foster an inclusive climate at three stages: 1) during the course design, 2) in the first week of class, and 3) while facilitating discussions.

 

Track/Theme: Online Learning and Teaching

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How to Conduct Evidence-Based Mid-Semester Evaluations in Your Online Course

Virginia Byrne and Alice Donlan - University of Maryland College Park

 

For online instructors, students are an important source of feedback on what is working (or not). We present an evidence-based mid-semester evaluation of online teaching.

 

Abstract: As more faculty are asked to teach online, college teaching and learning centers are tasked to provide support and guidance on how to effectively teach an online course. One way to support new instructors - that is scalable and low-cost - is to gather formative feedback from students. With mid-semester, formative feedback gathering with the right tool, instructors can gain formative feedback while they still have time in the semester to make changes. This session will provide participants with guidance on how to implement a validated mid-semester course evaluation tool for online teaching.

  

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand the purpose of mid-semester evaluations and formative feedback. (2) Understand the evidence behind the Mid-semester Evaluation of College Teaching for Online Courses (MSECT-O). (3) Make a plan for using mid-semester evaluations.

  

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Online Learning and Teaching

 

  A

 

Utilizing Small Business Partnerships to Enhance the Classroom Experience

Stephanie Adam - California University of PA

 

This session is designed to explore how university faculty can partner with local business leaders to create mutually-beneficial classroom experiences in which students gain hands-on exposure while businesses receive collaborative insight from a motivated "workforce."

 

Abstract: Perhaps now more than ever educators are looking for innovative ways to engage students in the classroom. This session will explore how faculty members can 1) create partnerships with local business leaders that generate opportunities for classroom projects 2) utilize those projects to expose students to skills they will need on the job and 3) provide business leaders with much-needed interaction with members of the upcoming generation. While the session utilizes business courses as an example, options will be given across disciplines to show how faculty can effectively implement this model regardless of field.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify partnership opportunities in their local area with either small businesses, non-profits, or agencies. (2) Create a potential project where students become "consultants" for a local business, non-profit, or agency. (3) Assess sample projects provided by the facilitator for their value and merit within the classroom

 

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners, Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Media: A Must for Making Meaningful Memories for Millennials!

Marie Allsopp and Ryan Calvert - Purdue University

 

If you are interested in seeing how commercials, movies, popular songs, talk shows and reality TV make learning memorable and meaningful come to this session!

 

Abstract: Now more than ever, we as educators have to compete with smartphones and other forms of technology that vie for our students’ attention. How can we make learning fun and memorable for our students? Good news! We no longer need to strive for ways to keep our students engaged throughout our lectures. Instead, participants will be equipped with creative ways to appropriately use media clips in class that will generate interest and excitement about learning. Everyone in attendance will walk away from this session knowing how to create and insert MP3 and MP4 files into PowerPoint slides.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Explain how media is used as a pedagogical methodology with millennial students. (2) Identify two ways media clips make learning meaningful and memorable in students. (3) Observe how to insert MP3 and MP4 clips into PowerPoint lectures.

 

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Mission Impossible: Engaging Post-Graduate Trainees

Danielle Alm and Nicholas Owens - University of the Sciences

 

Participants will be taken on the journey of two new faculty members’ mission to leverage low-cost educational technology to overhaul a regional teaching and learning program.

 

Abstract: In 2017, two new faculty members were charged with the daunting task of updating a well-established teaching and learning program to meet the evolving needs of approximately 40 post-graduate trainees annually from a variety of programs across the region. Participants in this session will discuss the development of improvements that respond to the diverse needs of new educators and strategize how to maintain engagement when covering fundamental teaching and learning topics. An educational technology obstacle course will challenge participants to identify low-cost technology solutions to a variety of programmatic challenges. The now hardened and experienced faculty members will share their insights and lessons learned.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe a process for assessing the evolving needs of new educators in the setting of limited resources. (2) Discuss a variety of strategies to maintain new educators’ longitudinal engagement in prioritizing high quality teaching. (3) Identify educational technologies to increase efficient delivery of a regional teaching and learning curriculum program.

 

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Preparing Future Faculty, Teaching Well with Classroom Technologies

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Active Learning Simulations as Alternatives to Traditional Information Literacy Instruction

Daphna Atias - University of the District of Columbia

 

This session explores information literacy simulations that move beyond the research paper, promote active learning, and help students effectively find, evaluate, use, and cite information.

 

Abstract: Research papers are the most common way to teach information literacy skills, but they are often high-stakes projects that treat information literacy as an end in itself rather than a constant in everyday life and work. This presentation suggests an alternative: simulations that incorporate finding, evaluating, and using information. Simulations allow for a smaller, lower-stakes experience with research, group collaboration, and the application of research in novel ways. The session will discuss the pedagogical benefits of simulations and explore a successful sample activity. Next, participants will design simulations appropriate for a variety of contexts.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe the benefits of simulations for finding and critically evaluating information and active learning. (2) Provide several examples of effective simulations. (3) Design simulations suited to different assignment, subject matter, course level, and technology use conditions.

 

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

 

Session Abstracts  Listed in alphabetical order by the lead presenter’s last name  (updated Apr. 15)

  C

 

The Early Bird Gets the Feedback: Lessons Learned from First-Time Instructors Following Formative Student Evaluations

Ryan Calvert and Marie Allsopp - Purdue University

 

Lessons learned by a first-time instructor and TA from early student feedback in an upper level college course will be shared in this session!

 

Abstract: Literature has cited that end of semester evaluations fail to allow for adjustments to be made in the course until the next time it is taught. A recent trend in academia is that instructors have begun obtaining mid-semester feedback in combination with summative feedback at the end of the semester to improve instructor effectiveness and the student learning. This pedagogical methodology can be especially helpful for new instructors and/or those with new preps. Attendees will leave this session with three lessons learned along the way to making modifications in the course that made students feel that their opinions mattered.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe one reason why to conduct an evaluation prior to the midway point of the semester. (2) State two best practices when conducting mid-semester surveys. (3) List three lessons learned from obtaining formative feedback from students

 

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Preparing Future Faculty

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Discovering Student-Student Engagement Opportunities through Online Course Peer Reviews

Mandi Campbell and Stephanie Henderson - University of West Georgia

 

This session will describe how two learning specialists used a peer review process to uncover opportunities for improved student-student engagement in online courses.

 

Abstract: Online instructors often struggle to facilitate meaningful student-student interactions. More specifically, they complain that traditional online discussions fail to stimulate genuine conversations about course content. Using Penn State’s Peer Review Guide, which adapts Chickering and Gamson’s (1987) Seven Principles for good practice in undergraduate education to facilitate the peer review of online courses, two learning specialist worked closely with online instructors while reviewing their online courses to find innovative ways to foster worthwhile student-student interaction.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Learn how Penn State’s Peer Review Guide uses Chickering and Gamson’s Seven Principles to facilitate the peer review of online courses. (2) Be introduced to innovative strategies for enhancing student-student interactions. (3) Plan how they can use the Peer Review Guide to improve student experiences in online courses at their institutions.

 

Track/Theme: Online Learning and Teaching

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Assessing Citizenship: Why We Can't Do It Alone

Stephen Carroll - Santa Clara University

 

This session explores why (especially in STEM) course-based assessments of civic-engagement/service-learning pedagogies directed at enhancing students’ citizenship competencies fail and why success requires multidisciplinary collaboration.

 

Abstract: Many civic-engagement and service-learning projects and pedagogies aim to improve students’ citizenship competencies so that they will make better, more rational decisions in their civic and political lives. Yet individual, departmental and even disciplinary approaches (especially common in STEM) usually fail to demonstrate gains in such competencies. This session will combine the National Council for the Social Studies’ (NCSS) definition of effective citizenship with a student-centered approach to assessing teaching and learning to generate a set of principles, practices and questions that reveals why evaluating gains in citizenship competencies requires collaboration across multiple disciplines.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Apply the National Council for the Social Studies' definition of citizenship to their own course designs and service-learning projects. (2) Develop effective assessments of citizenship gains in their civic-engagement pedagogies and service-learning projects. (3) Collaborate across disciplines to more effectively assess citizenship gains in their students.

 

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Service/Experiential Learning

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Learning to Question, Questioning to Learn: Inquiry for Student Success

Leah Chambers and Rich Lane - Clarion University

 

In this session, participants will understand, brainstorm, and develop strategies to employ the Question Formulation Technique (QFT) to build students’ creative critical thinking skills.

 

Abstract: As Rothstein and Santana note in Make Just One Change, teaching students to ask their own questions can “increase student achievement, build new relationships between learner and teacher and open new avenues for dialog and inquiry”. However, classrooms are most often places of answers and not places where students learn to form, develop, and explore their own questions. One way teachers can help students generate questions is with the Question Formulation Technique (QFT)—a complex but also engaging process that can be successfully adapted to any content area at any level.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe the Question Forming Technique (QFT) process and how and why it benefits students. (2) Brainstorm how the QFT can be utilized in their own classrooms by connecting it to their specific assignments, topics, and content. (3) Understand the process by experiencing it from a student’s perspective as participants work through the QFT within the session.

 

Track/Theme: Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Strategies for Incorporating Inclusive Pedagogy in STEM Courses

Mun Chun (MC) Chan - Georgetown University

 

We discuss how Inclusive Pedagogy have been incorporated in the design/redesign of STEM courses, and provide an opportunity for participants to begin their own process.

 

Abstract: In STEM departments, (re)designing and running a course using Inclusive Pedagogy (IP) strategies can feel isolating and quixotic. In the presenter’s institution, a number of STEM faculty in different departments have designed and taught different IP-STEM courses with the help of the institution’s Center of Teaching and Learning (CTL). We will present a few of these courses, showcasing different approaches and strategies in which IP elements are incorporated. We will then facilitate small group work for participants to adopt some of these strategies in redesigning a STEM course of their own choosing, and present their initial ideas to the session.

  

Learning Outcomes: (1) Creatively think of different strategies for incorporating IP elements into their STEM classes. (2) Better understand the unique and important supportive role CTLs have in helping individual STEM faculty in designing these classes. (3) Realize that the effort of incorporating Inclusive Pedagogy elements into a STEM course are oftentimes received well by students in the course, and rewarded with greater attention, retention and engagement.

 

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Multiculturalism/Diversity/Inclusion, STEM

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Approaches to Promoting Student Engagement Using a Learning Management System

Jennifer Chavez and Brian Boston - Management Leadership for Tomorrow and Georgetown University

 

This session explores principles and practices for engaging students using a learning management system (Canvas, Blackboard, Moodle, etc.) to foster meaningful and effective learning experiences.

 

Abstract: Faculty teaching face-to-face, online, and hybrid courses are often dismayed at the lack of student engagement within their learning management system (LMS) (e.g., Canvas, Blackboard, Moodle, Sakai, etc.). Understanding principles of student engagement and how these can be manifested on online platforms can enable faculty to create course experiences that are more engaging by design. This session addresses four core contributing factors to student engagement: relationships, interaction, success, and purpose. The presenters highlight several approaches to addressing these factors in an online space and showcase multiple examples. Attendees will identify activities relevant to their context and outline modified designs.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Reflect on what engages students. (2) Select from examples/models two to three ways they might use features in an LMS to engage students. (3) Create an outline of one engagement activity modified to their particular context.

 

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students, Online Learning and Teaching

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Open Door Classrooms: A Twist on Teaching Observations

Susanne Chuku - Westfield State University

 

Open Door Classrooms give faculty a chance to observe their peers in their “natural habitat” – their classrooms: a unique learning and networking opportunity.

 

Abstract: Since Fall 2018, the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning has organized “Open Doors at WSU.” For one (or two) weeks per semester, faculty members from various departments across campus volunteer to allow visitors into their classes. At a teaching institution like ours, junior faculty members benefit greatly from the opportunity to observe their peers as they are being reviewed by their department chairs regularly and now know better what is expected in the reappointment process. Senior faculty members may become inspired by professors in different disciplines to redesign their course or to consider a new teaching methodology.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Assess if Open Door Classrooms is an option for their institution / adjust or improve the process of organizing Open Door Classes if the program is already in place. (2) Increase faculty buy-in to participate in the program. (3) Expand a (possibly existing) Open Doors program to intensify the professional development experience.

 

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners, Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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What Is the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning? Seven Steps to Engage and Produce It

Milt Cox - Miami University

 

Participants will discuss seven steps that can help them find and design a teaching and learning project that could become a SoTL presentation and publication.

 

Abstract: There is a new discipline in higher education that features the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). The presenter of this workshop is an editor-in-chief of a journal that publishes the scholarship of teaching and learning. He will define and discuss the ongoing cycle of scholarly teaching and the scholarship of teaching and learning. In addition, participants will discuss seven steps that can transform a teaching, learning, or institutional problem or opportunity into SoTL. We will discuss a template that can assist the planning of a SoTL project that could lead to a SoTL publication.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe the ongoing cycle of scholarly teaching and the scholarship of teaching and learning. (2) Describe 7 steps that can help find and design a teaching and learning project that may lead to a SoTL presentation and publication. (3) Describe examples of SoTL projects and presentations.

 

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners, Faculty Development

 

 

  D

 

Student Success in Math Courses: Lessons from Interdisciplinary Interventions

Cynthia DeBoy, Kerry Luse, and Kent Kraft - Trinity Washington University

 

We will describe examples of a curriculum revision process including activities aimed to increase student success to lead participants through a self-reflective process.

 

Abstract: We will describe two major changes to our first-year curriculum to support success for STEM-track students: integration of relevant course-based science examples and implementation of a course to foster student belonging and increase skills for college success. We will describe our interventions in the context of existing literature and data we collected. We found that our revised curriculum enhances student belonging in STEM but does not increase success in introductory math. We will describe our interdisciplinary response to these findings including the process to identify more specific barriers in math courses and our evolving interventions.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Incorporate examples into their own classroom or curriculum to increase student success. (2) Develop their own process to identify barriers to student success within the curriculum or classes. (3) Identify interventions that may increase student success in their own settings

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, STEM

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Innovative Strategies for Embedding Universal Design for Learning

Karen Dennis - University of Mobile

 

Explore a redesigned course in the early childhood/elementary education program in which students present integrated curriculum built around Universal Design for Learning.

 

Abstract: If ever there was a time to revitalize teacher preparation courses in early childhood education, it is now. Embracing the joy of teaching should be on the syllabus of every course taken by early educators. A newly redesigned course focuses on keeping research-based pedagogical practices in place while creating a venue for implementing Universal Design for Learning principles. Participants will hear and see how this course prepares teacher candidates to deliver a well-rounded education and will work in collaborative groups to actively engage in one of the course's high-energy assignments.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand the importance of actively engaging students in the learning process. (2) Implement Universal Design for Learning strategies in a higher education classroom. (3) Plan an innovative method of delivering content in a higher education classroom.

 

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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The Fearless Teaching Framework: A Research-Based Model for Effective Teaching

Alice Donlan and Virginia Byrne - University of Maryland

 

Learn about defining “effective teaching” and the ways positive classroom climate, relevant content, evidence-based practices, and valid assessment strategies promote college student engagement and motivation.

 

Abstract: College instructors rely on high quality research on what motivates and engages students to become more effective teachers. However, there is no single definition for “effective teaching,” and education research is not always targeted to audiences outside of education disciplines. To address this gap, we present the Fearless Teaching Framework, which defines effective teaching in terms of classroom climate, course content, teaching practices, and assessment strategies. We will share the foundational research underlying the framework, strategies for becoming a more effective teacher, and ways to document improvements using validated course evaluation strategies aligned to the framework.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand the connections between climate, content, practice, and assessment as predictors of student motivation and engagement. (2) Apply the Fearless Teaching Framework to reflect on teaching and design college courses. (3) Evaluate teaching effectiveness, as defined by the Fearless Teaching Framework.

 

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Engaging and Motivating Students

 

 

  G

 

Promoting Academic Integrity and Discouraging Cheating and Plagiarism

Kathleen Gabriel - California State University, Chico

 

With increased pressures and advance technology, students may succumb to cheating on exams or plagiarizing papers. We can counter by using techniques that promote academic integrity.

 

Abstract: With increased pressures that many students have in their lives, along with the advance technology, many students might succumb to cheating on exams or plagiarizing papers. When writing papers, plagiarizing can be a purposeful or accidental. There are web page sites where students can buy a paper, but there are also students who do not clearly understand how to apply the basic rules for citing and quoting sources.

We cannot ignore cheating and plagiarism issues in hopes that it won’t happen. This workshop will address way to discourage cheating and plagiarism and share methods for promoting and maintaining academic integrity.

  

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify various techniques students use to cheat on exams or tests both in face-to-face and on-line settings and ways that research papers are bought, sources fabricate, and/or plagiarized. (2) Describe and analyze at least three techniques for promoting honesty and integrity as a part of the course climate and also in ways that can help prevent cheating on exams. (3) Describe and analyze at least three methods for creating writing assignments that discourage and help prevent fabrication, plagiarism, and/or out right “buying” research papers.

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Assessment, Student Learning, dealing with cheating on exams and plagiarism on papers

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Incorporating Digital Strategies into Assignments to Promote 21st Century Digital Literacy

Bart Ganzert - Winston-Salem State University

 

This session focuses on conceiving and developing projects and assessments for students that use multiple digital formats. A discussion of these elements and their importance will be accompanied by examples of these assignments.

 

Abstract: A critical element of a student’s digital education in the 21st century will need to include multiple exposures to digital information mediums. This will also encompass using multiple formats of digital media writing documents or reports, and will call for users to not just understand how to use different digital applications, but to be savvy in linking digital elements effectively within content. This session will discuss the changing paradigm of digital literacy and present ways of developing course assignments that incorporate multiple digital elements.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand the effects of the digital shift on this generation of students. (2) Know at least three alternative formats that can be included in an assignment.  (3) Create an assignment using multiple forms of media.

 

Track/Theme: Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Preparing Future Faculty, Teaching Well with Classroom Technologies

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Data-Driven Faculty Development: Creating a Tasty Buffet of Learning Options

Brad Garner and Mike Manning - Indiana Wesleyan University

 

Faculty development can be a slippery slope. This session focuses on ways to create data-driven, readily available, and responsive opportunities for faculty to continually improve and enhance their classroom/online teaching abilities.

 

Abstract: Faculty development must be perceived as a central function in institutions of higher education. For this reality to occur, those responsible must create systems that are responsive to the needs of faculty (e.g., availability, format, timing) as a path to better meet the needs of students through proficient and intentionally designed instruction. This session will provide a model for faculty development that is rooted in data-based decision making, provides options for faculty participation, includes an element of accountability, is directed related to the improvement of instruction, and provides a reward system for faculty participants.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Articulate a variety of strategies for gathering data related to the learning needs and preferences of full-time and adjunct faculty. (2) Visualize a variety learning venues and strategies that enhance the skills and competences of faculty in relation to teaching and learning.

(3) Create strategies for faculty accountability in relation to enhancement of teaching skills and strategies.

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Assessment, Student Learning, Preparing Future Faculty

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Finding an Online Peer-Assessment System to Meet Your Needs

Edward Gehringer - North Carolina State University

 

We examine reasons for using peer assessment, and applications for reviewing specialized kinds of work, like writing, case studies, or projects in the visual arts.

 

Abstract: In peer assessment, students are asked to give feedback to classmates on their work. Most LMSs have tools to facilitate peer assessment, but third-party providers may offer streamlined workflows and better visualizations of the reviewing process. We first look at the pedagogical reasons for using peer assessment, and then survey more than a dozen of the most widely used peer-assessment systems, focusing on the way they present feedback to instructor and students, and the features they have for reviewing particular kinds of work, such as writing, case studies, programming, or projects in the visual arts.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify several advantages of peer assessment, compared to other kinds of formative assessment. (2) Understand how peer-assessment systems help instructors measure the quality of student peer reviews. (3) Become familiar with peer-assessment applications that have features for reviewing the kinds of work that they assign.

 

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Online Learning and Teaching, Teaching Well with Classroom Technologies

 

 

  H

 

 

Teacher Evaluation for Teaching Effectiveness: The Morgridge College of Education Model

Norma Hafenstein and Laura Sponsler - University of Denver

 

What is effective teaching? How is effective teaching developed and measured? This interactive session provides an evaluation framework to guide development of effective teaching practices.

 

Abstract: This presentation shares the results of a multi-year process to research and design a new teaching effectiveness model undertaken by the University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education faculty. Participants will learn about the four components of the model (learning environment, professionalism, assessment of learning, and instruction: planning and delivery) and engage with the model through an interactive jigsaw to critique their own examples. In the jigsaw format, participants will receive a copy of the model, literature and current research on the components, and have the opportunity to critically reflect on improving their own teaching through evaluation strategies.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify elements of effective teaching and evaluation by examining related literature and using the Morgridge College of Education model as a framework. (2) Compare their own practices as a teacher to the literature and framework. (3) Leave with tangible resources for future reference, including: a copy of the model and a list of exemplar artifacts of teaching.

 

Track/Theme: Assessment, Teaching Evaluation

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Pairing Web 2.0 Tools Maximize Student Usage and Learning Outcomes

Andrea Hogan - Grand Canyon University

 

This presentation will explore ways instructors can pair Web 2.0 technologies to maximize student use and learning outcomes in hybrid and online classrooms.

 

Abstract: Research shows the use of Web 2.0 technologies in higher education increases active learning opportunities and a sense of community among students. This presentation will focus on ways instructors can maximize web 2.0 tools to increase student participation in Web 2.0 technology. Specifically, the presenter will demonstrate how REMIND can be used to conveniently provide links to access course material, Flipgrid video discussions, LOOM videos and Survey questions to leverage student down time by giving students access to technologies on their smart phones. Furthermore, ways Web 2.0 technologies can be effective platforms for classroom assessment techniques will be discussed.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Effectively use REMIND to pair technologies and increase student usage of other web 2.0 tools. (2) Demonstrate ways Web 2.0 tools can be used for classroom assessment techniques. (3) Understand the benefits of leveraging student access to mobile technology to increase student participation

 

Track/Theme: Online Learning and Teaching

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Innovative Ideas for Redesigning Face-to-Face Courses to Blended

Katherine Holman and Jennifer Kouo - Towson University

 

The session will discuss the QM redesign process, alignment of course objectives and engaging learning activities, and application of technology tools for a blended course.

  

Abstract: The presenters will share their experience using the Quality Matters (Standards from the Quality Matters Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition) rubric to redesign an action research course from face to face to a blended learning environment. The process of aligning the course goals, assessments and learning activities will be shared while demonstrating some of the innovative technologies used within the course. At the conclusion of the session, participants will be guided through a gallery walk of the various technologies and strategies utilized in the course redesign and the creation of an action plan for their first step in taking the information learned in this session back to their classrooms.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Use the Quality Matters (QM) rubric to design a course that effectively aligns course-level objectives, module-level objectives, assessments and learning activities. (2) Utilize the strategies learned for transforming face-to-face activities to online activities, while ensuring student engagement. (3) Develop a plan of action for applying the information gained from this session to take the first steps towards redesigning a course.

  

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students, Online Learning and Teaching

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The Role of Online Discussion in Online and Blended Class

Gregory K. Hotchkiss - Berkeley College

 

Through the question design and grading criteria, the research presents the problems that cause low participation rate for online discussion for blended and online classes.

 

Abstract: Online discussion, as a component of online and/or blended courses, allows students to have an informative conversation with their instructors and peers. Discussion forums may also serve a less academic purpose for students’ attendance verification. However, discussion forums sometimes fail from lack of interest, non-participation, or evidence of well-informed critical thinking. To explore the causes of low participation rates, the researchers examined the purpose and functions of discussion in online and blended classes. In addition to an administrative use of online discussion for attendance verification, the presenters propose a methodology to encourage student interest, engagement, and learning with online discussions.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Learn the correlation between the design of the discussion question and the activity of students’ in online discussion. (2) Share the questions design for active learning and grading criteria with the audiences. (3) Through discussions, the presenters and audiences will exchange information that is helpful to online discussion participation and learning experiences.

 

Track/Theme: Online Learning and Teaching

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A CURE to Develop Literacy Skills in Nonmajors Introductory Biology

Carol Hurney - Colby College

 

This session explores a Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experience for nonscience majors that includes iterative research experiences, collaboration, engagement with science, experience of discovery, and production of relevant, publicly displayed answers to beautiful, biological questions.

 

Abstract: This session presents and engages participants in a novel CURE (course-based undergraduate research experience) for a large-enrollment, introductory biology course for nonmajors that immerses students in a collaborative, feedback-enriched experience where they research scientific sources for content, which supports the development of their biology content knowledge while also enhancing scientific and information literacy skill development. Participants in this session will model the activities of this CURE by posing beautiful biological questions, researching answers to these questions and developing a knowledge construct (e.g., concept map, poems) that expresses their answer. Finally, we will examine the instructional viability of this CURE.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe the elements of a CURE. (2) Develop questions and assignments that support information literacy skills. (3) Adapt elements of this CURE to their courses

  

Track/Theme: Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

 

  J

 

Power in Student Voice: Positioning Undergraduates as Instructional Partners

Hannah Jardine - University of Maryland

 

Come learn about the various ways undergraduate teaching and learning assistants may be positioned as instructional partners and the value of hearing their perspective.

 

Abstract: At the University of Maryland, and many other campuses, support from undergraduates as teaching and learning assistants (UTLAs) is becoming more and more common. Beyond just aiding instructors in facilitating active learning, UTLAs can collaborate with faculty as instructional partners and support faculty in improving teaching and learning in their courses. In this presentation, I will describe the characteristics of successful instructional partnerships between faculty and UTLAs, share examples of different UTLA roles in those partnerships, and identify strategies to develop more collaborative partnerships.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe the characteristics of successful instructional partnerships between faculty and undergraduate teaching and learning assistants (UTLAs). (2) Examine examples of the different roles UTLAs play when interacting with faculty members. (3) Identify strategies for developing more collaborative partnerships between instructors and undergraduate teaching and learning assistants.

 

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Creating Communities of Learners, Preparing Future Faculty

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Teaching Thinking: Strategies to Support Student Engagement and Metacognition

Hannah Jardine - University of Maryland

 

In this session, you will learn about and experience “thinking routines,” or strategies to help learners understand the thinking process and develop critical thinking skills.

 

Abstract: “Thinking” is essential for learning, but can be difficult to define and challenging to support in the classroom. Thus, educators must consider: What does “thinking” look like for you and your students? Are you promoting the types of “thinking” that students need to succeed in your course or discipline? In this session, you will learn about and experience “thinking routines,” or strategies to help learners understand the thinking process and develop critical thinking skills. We will discuss benefits of putting student thinking at the center of instruction, and consider how to incorporate “thinking ” into our classrooms.

  

Learning Outcomes: (1) Discuss the benefits of putting student thinking at the center of instruction. (2) Explore examples of “thinking routines” to help learners understand the thinking process. (3) Identify at least one “thinking routine” you can incorporate into your instruction.

 

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students

 

 
 

  K

 

Transactional Distance: Synchronous Videoconferencing Increases Social Presence for Some Students

Heather Kennedy - University of Northern Iowa

 

We present SOTL findings illustrating synchronous videoconferencing increased social presence in a blended course, but only for certain types of students.

 

Abstract: While blended and online courses offer increased flexibility, decreased student engagement and transactional distance remains problematic. Further understanding is needed for effective course design, where flexibility is maintained but enough social presence is created to minimize disengagement. This mixed-methods study examined the influence of synchronous videoconferencing on social engagement in a blended course. Three unique student profiles (i.e., receptive, ambivalent, and resistant) emerged in relation to technology integration and appeared directly related to student engagement and likely cognitive presence. In addition to modality, findings highlight the importance of “student” and interpersonal aspects which foster student engagement and learning.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand how transactional distance is more or less present in a blended course based on specific student profiles with technology use (i.e., synchronous video). (2) Understand the relevance of different types of students in designing online and/or blended courses, specifically as it relates to the use of different technologies and impacts on engagement and learning. (3) Identify strategies for designing blended and online courses that will best use technology and attend to decreased transitional distance and increased learning.

 

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students, Online Learning and Teaching, Teaching Well with Classroom Technologies

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Assessing Impact: Organizational and Community Outcomes of Academic Service-Learning Courses

Jeannette Kindred - Eastern Michigan University

 

An active learning workshop that uncovers research findings and methods related to organizational and community impacts of Academic Service-Learning (AS-L) as reported by community partners.

 

Abstract: This session provides an overview of research on AS-L impacts at the organizational and community level and reviews established methods used to assess organizational and community impacts, and the strengths and weaknesses of those assessment practices. Examples of survey tools and interview protocols utilized in research on community impacts of AS-L will be provided, and attendees will leave with specific ideas and methods for assessing the impact of their AS-L programs and courses. Finally, methods and findings from a comprehensive study of the impact of one specific course (Communication Capstone) on organizations and communities will be discussed.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand the kinds of outcomes and impact that can be measured via self-reports of community partners as well as various methods for assessing organizational and community impact of Academic Service-Learning programs and courses. (2) Identify the kinds of community impact data that would be useful to improve and enhance their own AS-L efforts. (3) Modify or design a survey and/or interview protocol that is appropriate for uncovering organizational and community impact of their program’s or institution’s service-learning activities.

 

Track/Theme: Service/Experiential Learning

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FYCE: Putting the First Year Experience into Your Class

Kent Kraft - Trinity Washington University

 

Incorporating successful FYE practices into the classroom and office hour visits increases student submission rates and grades in first year math courses.

 

Abstract: There is wide agreement on successful First Year Experience (FYE) practices incorporated into orientations across the country. The time frame institutions have to imbue their students with this knowledge is limited and these practices should start coming into the classroom. Two separate first year math courses were overhauled to incorporate several practices based on FYE information which altered the way the instructor approached out of class projects and office hour visits. The results include an increase in the number of projects submitted throughout the semester, an increase in overall grades of those projects and fewer students withdrawing from the courses.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand how to effectively interact and build trust with students during office hours. (2) Incorporate minor alterations to existing coursework to improve student outcomes. (3) Utilize several tools to make the workload lighter for the professor to schedule office hour visits.

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Engaging and Motivating Students, Building Self-efficacy

 

  L

 

Teaching About Human Rights Through Service Learning

Castagna Lacet - Bridgewater State University

 

This session uses articles of the UN Declaration on Human Rights as a foundation for understanding social problems in agencies where students conduct service learning.

 

Abstract: Social problems may simply be understood as the result of unjust conditions or personal misfortune. In order to help students deepen their understanding of social justice and structural inequities, a human rights approach is necessary. This session explains how articles of the UN Declaration on Human Rights can be used to deepen this understanding with students engaged in service learning in community based agencies. Strategies and assignments are discussed.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) By the end of this session, participants will be able to identify Human Rights articles associated with specific social problems. (2) Apply a human rights perspective to address a social issue of concern. (3) Identify goals or integrating a human rights perspective in a service learning course of their own.

 

Track/Theme: Service/Experiential Learning

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Increasing Engagement in Introductory Courses: Standing Out from the Crowd

Jamie Lambert - Ohio University

 

This session will provide a roadmap to increasing engagement in an introductory course; helping instructors to stand out in their student’s minds.

 

Abstract: If you ask faculty what their biggest challenges are in the classroom, most will tell you that it stems from disengaged students. This challenge is especially troubling because of the negative impact that it has on everyone involved; students dread coming to class and don’t learn as much, while faculty may also dread coming to class and receive lower teaching evaluations. This session will provide tested solutions to this ongoing struggle based on an introductory course. In addition, participants will have an opportunity to work with others in order to use these recommendations to craft their own engagement plan.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand how to set the hook for engagement from the first day of class. (2) Apply the successes of another faculty member to their own classes. (3) Develop and an engagement plan that helps to maintain student’s involvement through the last class of the semester.

 

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students

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Using Concurrent Multi-Discipline Learning to Drive Career Readiness

Jamie Lambert and Brandt Conner - Ohio University

 

This presentation will underscore that students who experience concurrent multi-discipline learning are more career ready than their counterparts, thus providing them with a competitive advantage.

 

Abstract: As they progress from college graduates to new hires, students need to develop and refine valuable soft skills in order to enhance career readiness. This session will demonstrate how concurrent multi-discipline learning can benefit this important effort. Those in Higher Education who help instill career readiness, as well as employers challenged to select the most competent hires, know that this is among life’s most critical transitions. This presentation will underscore that students who experience concurrent multi-discipline learning are more career ready than their counterparts, thus providing them with a competitive advantage.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Better understand the inner workings of a concurrent multi-discipline learning approach. (2) Realize how concurrent multi-discipline learning provides both content knowledge and a variety of vital soft skills. (3) Recognize the provision of soft skills and related attributes in driving the career readiness that employers value.

 

Track/Theme: Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Self-Service, Service Learning: Creating Community Partnerships that Benefit Everyone

Rich Lane and Leah Chambers - Clarion University

 

This session will engage participants in discussion of methods of constructing “sites” of service, partnerships between communities and universities, which provide service opportunities for students.

 

Abstract: This session will engage participants in consideration of a different form of service-learning and of forming community-university partnerships: creating and maintaining your own site(s) of service-learning. The definitions and advantages/disadvantages of service-learning will be discussed, and the example of the creation of Community Learning Workshop, a homework and tutoring center, in a rural university town will launch a brainstorming session concerning ways to create, and not just to rely on existing service sites. This session will also engage participants in discussion about the benefits of community and university service collaborations to increase stakeholders’ cultural competence and empathy for the “other”.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand and articulate the definitions and various forms of service-learning. (2) Develop methods to embed service-learning in meaningful ways into their own courses and university programs. (3) Begin to imagine service “sites” of their own, which serve university students and build bridges between the community and university.

 

Track/Theme: Service/Experiential Learning

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Using Data to Teach More Effectively and Inclusively

Dan Levy and Theodore Svoronos - Harvard University

 

The proposed session will discuss Teachly, a project at the Harvard Kennedy School aimed at helping faculty members teach more inclusively and more effectively.

 

Abstract: The proposed session will discuss Teachly, a project at the Harvard Kennedy School aimed at helping faculty members teach more inclusively and more effectively. It helps faculty teach more inclusively by nudging them to create classroom environments in which every student in the class feels welcome and encouraged to participate, and no patterns emerge in which certain groups systemically under-participate relative to their proportion in the classroom. We will be sharing results from various pilots conducted last year demonstrated that showing these data and evidence to faculty members can lead to meaningful behavior changes in the classroom.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand how Teachly has been used by faculty to enhance their pedagogy and improve inclusion in the classroom at Harvard University. (2) See concrete examples for how technology, data and evidence can be used to encourage classroom behavior changes. (3) Recognize some of the benefits of leveraging technology to achieve measurable outcomes and improve pedagogy.

 

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students, Multiculturalism/Diversity/Inclusion, Teaching Well with Classroom Technologies

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Curating Innovative Technology to Enrich Your Face-to-Face Classes

David Lloyd and Rod McRae - University of West Georgia

 

Using proper educational technology in your face-to-face class can change your student’s outcomes, as well as your student’s evaluation of instruction.

 

Abstract: We have entered an era in our society where the term “technology-enhanced” is quickly becoming the standard protocol. Our cars park, and even drive, themselves, our dishwashers send us a text when the dishes are done, and our refrigerators order food for us. It should be no surprise that today’s students are no longer happy with classrooms that lack technology. This presentation will look at ways to enhance your face-to-face classes with useful technology.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Engage students using at least one type of educational technology. (2) Create an educational opportunity that involves digital collaboration. (3) Use technology, as an instructor, to improve accessibility in a face-to-face class

 

Track/Theme: Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Online Learning and Teaching, Teaching Well with Classroom Technologies

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Strategies to Take New Faculty Beyond Boundaries

Dawn Lucas - Pfeiffer University

 

Participants will engage in activities to think strategically about developing a balanced and blended faculty development program for new faculty which is critical to acclimate the new faculty to their institution, and in some cases into the realms of the academy.

 

Abstract: Strategic focus and the development of key relationships across campuses while remaining steadfast and committed to a new faculty development program that is effective, efficient, meaningful, and relevant are keys to success. Participants will engage in activities to think strategically about developing a balanced and blended faculty development program for new faculty which is critical to acclimate the new faculty to the institution, and in some cases into the realms of the academy. Two major takeaways include: (1) Development of strategies around a conceptual framework that puts knowledge, skills, and disposition at the forefront of faculty development; (2) A demonstration of how strategic mapping can help new faculty align professional goals with institutional priorities.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand how the use of strategic mapping can assist new faculty with aligning professional goals with institutional priorities. (2) Understand how to create a conceptual framework that prioritizes knowledge, skill, and disposition development of new faculty. (3) Understand, through guided reflective practice, how new faculty development activities at their respective institutions can be categorized as effective, relevant, and meaningful.

 

Track/Theme: Preparing Future Faculty

 

  M

 

“Who’s In My Class Today?” Bringing Peers Into Your Classroom

Kevin Maxwell - Penn State Fayette, The Eberly Campus

 

How discussions in a campus faculty-learning community led us each back to the classroom – but not our own! A peer class-visit program is discussed.

 

Abstract: Often at meetings of our campus faculty-learning community, discussions center around techniques and innovations we hear that each other are using in our classes. We soon realized that there was a need for a regular system of opening up our classrooms to each other. Willing faculty are now able to arrange for non-evaluative visits to each other’s classrooms to see first-hand how we all teach. In this session the experiences of creating, planning, and maintaining this peer-visit system will be discussed. The benefits to both the “teacher” and “student” in this system and feedback from post-visit surveys will be shared.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Create and plan their own peer class-visit program. (2) Understand the benefits of peer-visits to both the instructor and the visiting peer student. (3) Use a peer class visit program to gain insight into how other faculty teach and then how to share feedback post-visit in a non-evaluative manner.

 

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners

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Designing an Effective Substance Abuse Class

Patrick McElwaine - Holy Family University

 

This presentation will demonstrate how to create an effective and impactful Substance Abuse Class at all educational levels.

 

Abstract: This presentation will demonstrate how to develop an effective substance abuse class using creative and impactful pedagogical approaches. The facilitator will review substance abuse information, stigma, and explore various activities and experiential experiences designed to help beginning and advanced students gain more in-depth understanding and awareness of substance abuse. Workshop will also include discussion regarding assessments, evidence-based treatments, support groups, and various ways of engaging in advocacy at a community level.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify 2-3 ways to increase the understanding of substance abuse, stigma, and advocacy. (2) Develop or introduce 2-3 activities in the substance abuse class that can increase knowledge and skills with students. (3) Explore various experiential activities allowing students to gain deeper level understanding of substance abuse, stigma, and advocacy.

 

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Helping All Students to Succeed: Ways to TILT Assignment Design

Rod McRae and Mandi Campbell - University of West Georgia

 

Transparent assignment design has produced promising findings, indicating that all students benefitted from TILTed assignments, but greater benefits for first-generation, low-socioeconomic, and non-White students.

 

Abstract: This interactive session focuses on how transparently designed assignments can foster increased student learning and engagement, leading to improved student outcomes—such as academic confidence, sense of belonging, employer-valued skills, GPA, and retention (Winkelmes et al., 2015; Winkelmes et al., 2016). By providing compelling evidence for faculty, instructional designers, and educational developers, this session explores the assignment design process, a part of the Transparent in Learning and Teaching (TILT) Higher Ed Project, and also presents linkages between TILT and two important theoretic frameworks that influence learning: self-efficacy (Bandura, 1997) and expectancy–value theory of motivation (Wigfield & Eccles, 2000).

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify how specific elements of a TILTed assignment connect with improvements in learning and achievement for students, especially historically marginalized students. (2) Develop a functional understanding of the value of TILT-based methods to assignment design in boosting student success and vital achievement outcomes. (3) Recognize connections between the TILT-aligned assignment approach and related theoretical frameworks

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success

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Equipping Students to Overcome Challenges

Sal Meyers and Brian Smith - Simpson College and Graceland University

 

We’ll identify syllabus revisions and activities to help students overcome the challenges they face whether those challenges are personal or linked to social marginalization.

 

Abstract: Students encounter a wide variety of challenges during their college careers including challenges associated with racism, poverty, and social marginalization. Instructors can equip students to overcome these challenges in a variety of ways. In this interactive session, we’ll examine three ways of doing so: emphasizing learning over performance, reminding students of sources of support, and building genuine (not foolish) hope. Participants will leave with concrete plans for in class activities they can use and ways of revising their syllabi.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify ways of emphasizing learning over performance in their classes. (2) Identify ways of reminding students about sources of support that can help them overcome challenges. (3) Build hope by encouraging students to set goals and identify pathways for reaching those goals including ways of working around roadblocks

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Multiculturalism/Diversity/Inclusion

 

  N

 

Increasing Student Engagement in Online Courses

Louisa Nkrumah - University of Maryland, College Park

 

Summarize, synthesize, and discuss research on student engagement and identify methods to increase engagement in fully online courses.

 

Abstract: In online courses, students can easily feel isolated and disengaged if they do not have opportunities to communicate and collaborate with their instructor and peers. Keeping students engaged is an essential component of effective online teaching and helps to promote student success and learning. This presentation will summarize and synthesize research about student engagement, and share methods to increase engagement, in order to create an enjoyable experience for both instructors and students in the online classroom.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Define the dimensions of student engagement. (2) Recognize the dimensions of instructor presence. (3) Discuss and identify methods for increasing student engagement in online courses.

 

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students, Online Learning and Teaching

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Investigative Projects in First Year General Chemistry Laboratory

Sophia Nussbaum - University of British Columbia

 

A mixed mode approach to investigative projects in a guided inquiry laboratory setting for large numbers of first year chemistry students will be described.

 

Abstract: Our First Year General Chemistry Laboratory employs a mixed mode delivery of course material within a guided inquiry laboratory setting for a large number of first year chemistry students. The first term teaches basic laboratory skills within the larger context of preparing the students for investigative projects in the second term. The methodology used to teach the essential aspects of scientific research combines multiple components encompassing the introduction to the scientific reasoning in hands-on lab tutorials, reading scientific articles, online support to design the projects, performing experiments, writing a journal style report, and creating, presenting and peer-evaluating a poster.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Assess out-of-the-lab support for students in designing a project. (2) Assess each of the on-line and off-line components. (3) Assess the methodology used to introduce students to scientific writing.

 

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Online Learning and Teaching

 

  O

 

Political Transparency in the Classroom: Student Autonomy and Faculty Authenticity

James Olsen and Molly Wilder - Georgetown University

 

A moral framework is offered for thinking through complex variables involved in faculty decisions concerning political transparency in the classroom, together with related teaching techniques.

 

Abstract: Given contemporary social and political dynamics, a common default is to avoid politics in the classroom. We will elucidate key variables and tensions involved in doing so and then offer a moral framework for thinking through the complexity of political disclosure. We will then argue that the development of student autonomy as well as faculty authenticity provide compelling reasons for professors to be politically transparent to their students—at least in principle. The latter part of the session will be dedicated to engaging participants in the hard work of brainstorming and analyzing concrete techniques for doing this well.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Articulate a complex web of interrelated moral variables at play when faculty reveal or conceal their own political judgments, including potential risks and benefits to learning. (2) Situate the ongoing debate over political bias within a larger framework of broadly accepted goals and values in higher education. (3) Identify concrete pedagogical tools for responsibly negotiating these tensions in the classroom

 

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners

 

  P

 

Gamification: A Teaching Tool to Engage Adult Learners

Dimitrios Papanagnou, Carlos Rodriguez, and Mansoor Siddiqui - Thomas Jefferson University

 

Educators always seek new ideas to help improve educational content delivery and retention of curricula. We introduce gamification as a tool to engage adult learners.

 

Abstract: Educators are routinely challenged by the need improve the delivery of educational content and enhance retention of their curricula. Gamification, a teaching modality that uses game elements in learning environments, has shown promise for increasing both medical knowledge and learner engagement by using activities that are competitive with a set of rules and a specific reward. This session introduces gamification as a useful tool with which to design educational content for residents and fellows that meets the criteria for high quality adult learning.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe how gamification meets best practices in adult learning theory. (2) List gaming modalities that may apply to their curricular content. (3) Plan their own gamified curriculum for an area of programmatic need.

 

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Investing Students in Their Own Learning Through Problem Solving

Judith Parker Kent - University of the Sciences

 

This presentation will examine how to effectively use a deconstructed learning experience to support student learning and how students responded to this learning environment.

 

Abstract: With the continued focus on outcomes and use of rubrics, students and educators link success with points and grades. In the messy classroom the focus is specifically geared to student learning through exploration, failure as a learning process and self-reflection. This presentation will examine a course designed with this focus, students perceptions of this process and ultimately their successes.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Explore the development of a "messy" course. (2) Discuss students perceptions of a "messy" classroom. (3) Identify ways to create classroom settings supportive of student self-identified learning

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Creating Communities of Learners, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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3 Ways to Use Personality Theory to Enhance Teaching Practice

Aimee Pascale - Northern Vermont University, Lyndon

 

Discuss methods for incorporating personality theory into instructional practice. Discussion will focus on improving teacher-student interactions, assignment intentionality, and intentional student grouping.

 

Abstract: Educators have used personality theory as a means of influencing teaching and learning in academia. The presenter will provide a summary of the True Colors personality classification system, followed by facilitated discussion on three ways educators can apply personality theory to practice. Discussions will relate to improving teacher-student interactions, assignment intentionality, and intentional grouping of students.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand how educator knowledge of personality theory can be used to improve teaching methods. (2) Know how to apply personality theory for purposes of improving teacher-student communication. (3) Understand implications personality theory holds for intentional grouping of students to optimize productivity.

 

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Improving Student Writing as a Result of Using Peer Review

Karen Pezzolla - Bloomfield College

 

For my students, writing to demonstrate learning was challenging, as a result, teaching students to peer review had a direct effect on improving their writing.

 

Abstract: For many students, writing effectively to demonstrate learning can be a tedious, frustrating, and challenging endeavor. All too often, students come to college with undeveloped writing strategies and competencies, however, the expectation is that college students will be able to write well, with too many falling short of meeting that expectation. To add to the problem, most courses do not help students develop much needed writing skills. Providing students with feedback, specifically students providing feedback to each other, can be an effective way to improve student writing.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe the process of effective peer review. (2) Create effective peer review groups. (3) Model effective commenting.

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Preparing Future Faculty

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From Obstacle to Advantage: Overcoming Challenges in Developing Online Courses

Stacy Pinto - University of Denver

 

This presentation identifies common challenges in designing an online courses and offers evidence- and experience-based solutions for overcoming them and transforming them into strengths.

 

Abstract: Designing an online course carries unique challenges. While the challenges vary between content and available technology, generating original online coursework requires a unique approach characterized by resourcefulness, optimism, and a flexible mindset. This presentation identifies types of challenges that course designers may face, provides an opportunity for participants to think critically about their own current or potential challenges, and offers both evidence- and experience-based solutions that assist in not only overcoming the challenges, but transforming them into strengths in the delivery of the course material.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Articulate potential challenges in developing an online course. (2) Identify potential resources that may help to overcome challenges in designing online courses. (3) Critically examine potential challenges of online course design from a variety of perspectives, toward reaching a positive solution for their own work in the future.

 

Track/Theme: Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Online Learning and Teaching, Preparing Future Faculty

 

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Strategies to Increase Student Engagement Through Integration of External Tools into the Learning Management System

Jayanthi Rajan and Soma Ghosh - Albright College

 

The presentation provides an overview of how external online tools are integrated into the learning management system to increase productivity and collaboration.

 

Abstract: Technology that allows students to interact with course content increases engagement and leads to higher rates of completion. In this presentation, we will share the experience of introducing three ed tech tools e -link, Trello and Flipgrid via the learning management system. Participants will have the opportunity to first interact with the technologies and then will learn how to use them in their own classrooms to enhance student engagement and understanding of course material. Our presentation will share the methodology of using the tools, effective teaching tips, assessment and lessons learned.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Discuss how the tools can be used in the course for project management, content curation and collaboration. (2) Explain the benefits and possible downsides of each of the tools used. (3) Discuss assessment methods that can be used to measure student performance.

 

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students, Teaching Well with Classroom Technologies

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Factors Influencing Online Graduate Student Progress: A Model for Graduate Student Success

Janet Reid Hector - Rutgers University

 

Evaluate mitigating factors of online graduate student success; and determine effectiveness of an online enhanced structured course to facilitate student progress to meet requirements for graduation through a three year mixed method study.

 

Abstract: The growth velocity of on-line master’s degrees continues with a lag in best practices. Time-to-degree-completion (TTDC) varies and student progress slows in the final phase of degree completion known as capstone or thesis project. The dearth of literature inhibits creation and implementation of strategies to foster student progress .To address this issue, a three year explanatory, mixed method study was conducted to identify mitigating factors of graduate student success; and determine effectiveness of an online enhanced structured course. The results of this study has direct implications for faculty, students and institutions of higher learning; and contribute to practice regarding pedagogical strategies to positively influence online student success.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Evaluate factors that facilitate academic progress of online graduate students. (2) Evaluate factors that hinder academic progress of online graduate students. (3) Assess specific course characteristics of an enhanced structured online course that support online graduate student success

 

Track/Theme: Online Learning and Teaching

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Building Professional Development Communities: A Model for Faculty Development

Beth Riggs, Jim Gentry, and Brittany Rodriguez - Tarleton State University

 

This session will describe a process to structure and implement a Professional Development Community (PDC) for faculty at your institution – led by faculty!

 

Abstract: This session will describe a process to structure and implement a Professional Development Community (PDC) for faculty at your institution – led by faculty! From recruiting and structuring group meetings (including outreach campuses), to planning for individual and community accountability, we will share “lessons learned” during our first year of serving as faculty leaders for the PDCs at our institution. Furthermore, we will share our “next steps” as we expand the PDCs, including strategies to increase participation. Finally, we will share a research methodology we are using to study faculty growth from participating in the PDC and its related activities.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Structure and implement a Professional Development Community at their respective institutions. (2) Recruit faculty and plan for group meetings for a Professional Development Community. (3) Use a research methodology to gauge the effectiveness of a Professional Development Community with regards to faculty growth.

 

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Faculty Development

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Thank a Teacher Week: Advancing Institutional Climate for Teaching

Scott Roberts - University of Maryland

 

Pedagogical innovations thrive on campuses with strong climates for teaching, so what can faculty and teaching centers do to advance climate? Just say thank you!

 

Abstract: Our mission is to serve as agents of culture change, advancing the climate for teaching. One of the four components of climate is recognition, so in 2017 we launched our first-ever Thank a Teacher Week to celebrate the impact that instructors and assistants have had on the lives of students and alumni. Each year, we organize a high-visibility campaign of events and messaging, collect thousands of thank you notes, and host a reception for recipients of teaching-related awards. We will share our experience and strategize together on how to do something similar on your campus.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe the four elements of a campus’ climate for teaching. (2) Identify action steps for creating Thank a Teacher Week on your own campus. (3) Develop a plan to assess the impact any campus-wide activities.

 

Track/Theme: Advancing Campus Climate for Teaching

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The Ideal Mix of Face-to-Face, Hybrid, and Online Courses

William Robertson - The University of Texas at El Paso

 

This session’s purpose is to articulate best practices of an ideal mix of course delivery approaches through face-to-face, hybrid and online classes in higher education.

 

Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to showcase a study from the University of Texas at El Paso on the design of an ideal mix of course delivery approaches through face-to-face, hybrid and online classes. The goals are to better understand the overall student degree journey with particular reference to an appropriate balance of methodologies, technologies and experiences, as well as to identify the keys to improving faculty engagement and implementation in the use of technology and eLearning pedagogy in order to enhance programs of study while addressing what students need to learn and how faculty want students their learning.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify the characteristics of an Ideal Mix of courses within a degree program design. (2) Distinguish between face-to-face, hybrid and online course delivery formats. (3) Understand how active learning and eLearning pedagogy can best be integrated into the Ideal Mix of courses.

 

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign

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Designer and Peer Review Perspectives on Quality Matters and a Gold Review

David Robinson and Carrie McFadden - Towson University

 

This session will facilitate shared experiences related to quality assurance review of online courses using a University adaptation of the Quality Matters (QM) rubric.

 

Abstract: This conference session will facilitate shared experiences related to quality assurance review of online courses. Resources and strategies from the perspectives of a University adaptation of the Quality Matters (QM) rubric will be shared by a QM course designer and a QM course reviewer. A jigsaw cooperative learning activity will permit participants to share concerns and issues encountered in online course design and implementation in small groups, and subsequently will all participants. Successes in online learning and course design will subsequently be shared to facilitate the successful design of courses to reflect sound pedagogy, course alignment and accessibility.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify strategies for Quality Assurance design and review of online courses. (2) Utilize session resources and templates in the design and implementation of online courses. (3) Establish a plan for the design or redesign of courses for online instruction based on best practice in Quality Assurance and Course Design.

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Online Learning and Teaching

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Flipping a Science Hybrid Course Using Collaborative Learning

Paula Rodgers - Northern Virginia Community College

 

In this workshop we will explore strategies for incorporating collaborative learning into the classroom. Participants will engage in collaborative learning while reflecting on their experiences.

 

Abstract: There is an increasing body of evidence which demonstrates the value of a collaborative course design on student learning. Collaborative learning can enhance student engagement, performance and retention in a course. In a content heavy course such as anatomy and physiology, a hybrid design provides instructors with the opportunity to engage students in collaborative learning by having students learn the fundamentals online before coming to class. This frees up time in class to engage students collaboratively with the material, thus “flipping the class.” In this workshop we will explore ways to successfully incorporate collaborative learning into any class environment.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe the benefits of collaborative learning on student performance, engagement and retention in a course. (2) Reflect upon the benefits of a flipped course and the use of hybrid/blended learning to enhance collaborative learning. (3) Leave with a list of collaborative activities that others have used successfully in their courses

 

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

 

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Transparent Questioning = Thinking Students

Julie Schrock - Meredith College

 

This session examines how transparency methods can be applied to questioning practices leading to more engaged and responsive students.

 

Abstract: Developing good questions and posing them effectively may be one of the most powerful instructional tools. Effective questions keep students engaged, help students identify gaps in understanding and rehearse information, create curiosity, and support students in making connections. Transparency in teaching and learning is the act of explicitly attending to and articulating to students the whys and hows of their learning experiences. Applying transparency to questioning can result in students who are more responsive to class questions. Participants in this session will examine transparent methods and how to apply them to questioning in their classes, leading to more responsive students.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Explain the benefits of transparent teaching practices. (2) Describe how transparent teaching practices can be applied to questioning. (3) Apply transparent teaching practices to questioning in their classes

 

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students

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Disappointment and Failure: When Teaching Almost Breaks Your Heart

Harriet Schwartz - Carlow University

 

How do we understand and move on from profound experiences of disappointment and failure in teaching?

 

Abstract: All who teach experience occasional failure and disappointment, for example learning activities that fall flat or individual students who resist learning. However, this session deals with more intense experiences such as on-going and widespread student resistance within a course or entire courses that seem to fail. In this session, we will explore relevant themes including impasse, downward spiral, relational paradox, and failure as a workplace construct. We will draw on concepts from organizational studies and psychology to further understand and move on from these demoralizing experiences, and to seek to short-circuit or minimize the impact of future occurrences.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Apply misperception, impasse, spiral, and relational paradox to understand these difficult teaching experiences. (2) Apply Newton, Khanna, & Thompson’s, (2008) navigating failure model to their own experience or a related case. (3) Identify and commit to at least three proactive strategies to reduce the likelihood of failed classes or semesters and to bolster resilience given the inevitable ups and downs of teaching.

 

Track/Theme: Preparing Future Faculty, Faculty Life

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Student Engagement in Online Learning: What Works and Why

Christopher Sessums - D2L Ltd

 

Keeping students involved and actively learning is challenging educators across the country. This session offers faculty tips and strategies to motivate and engage online learners.

 

Abstract: How would you characterize today’s college students? Empowered? Confident? Self-motivated? Keeping students involved and actively learning is challenging educators across the country, yet good advice on how to accomplish this is not always readily available. This session offers faculty tips and strategies to motivate and engage online learners.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Share and discuss strategies to actively engage online learners. (2) Explore techniques used to promote deeper student engagement in online learning environments. (3) Engage with each other to determine which strategies are most appropriate based on a case in question.

 

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Online Learning and Teaching

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Creating More Effective Teaching with Signature Pedagogy Faculty Learning Communities

Jenn Shinaberger and Lee Shinaberger - Coastal Carolina University

 

A faculty learning community structure was used to examine how signature pedagogies can improve student learning. Results are presented from a business statistics course.

 

Abstract: Faculty learning communities provide a framework for sustained faculty development (Cox, 2004). A faculty developer and an instructor describe their experiences with a university’s inaugural faculty learning community. Using signature pedagogies, faculty members examined their own teaching practices and current practices within their disciplines with the goal of improving student achievement. Participants took part in a multi-disciplinary learning community to redesign their courses and implement scholarship of teaching and learning projects. One instructor presents the results from efforts to improve students’ statistical reasoning using blocking, spacing, and interleaving.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Discuss how faculty learning communities can be used to provide a framework for course improvements through disciplinary-based research. (2) Evaluate opportunities for students to create disciplinary habits of mind using signature pedagogies as a lens. (3) Compare advantages of blocking, spacing, and interleaving in instruction.

 

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign

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Revision: Uncharted Territory

Arna Shines - Tougaloo College

 

The writing instructor must be prepared and equipped to introduce freshmen to the concept and necessity of revision.

 

Abstract: Writing, it seems, evokes one of two emotions in freshmen—exaggerated confidence or crippling insecurity, but there is a factor, which levels the playing field--high school, in many instances, does not prepare students for academic writing or revision. The instructor must be unfazed by this truth, and must help students to transition from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset about writing, the writing process, and revision.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Help students recognize the difference between writing and writing as a process. (2) Understand why revision is foreign to new students. (3) Craft creative revision opportunities for students.

 

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Preparing Future Faculty

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Modified Flipped Classroom for Science Courses: Yes! It Works

Shyamala Sivalingam - Anne Arundel Community College

 

Learn how we modified the flipped classroom model in our classes to meet the needs of our diverse group of students in General Chemistry 1.

 

Abstract: This presentation will summarize specific implementation strategies as well some general principles when considering how to adapt the flipped classroom model to meet your students’ needs. The best practices used in the classroom to keep students motivated will be discussed. Qualitative and quantitative data regarding the impact on student success and retention will be presented. The strategies to implement flipped classroom across the disciplines will be suggested and brain stormed in small groups.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Create and and implement the flipped classroom model to meet the needs of their own diverse group of students. (2) Apply the best practices that could be adapted in their classroom. (3) Learn the strategies to increase retention and keep students motivated.

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Bloom’s Blitz: Active Learning Techniques to Assess Your Students

Stacey Souther - Cuyahoga Community College

 

This session will take participants on a “Blitz” through Bloom’s six levels while providing a suggestion of a multi-disciplinary active learning technique for each level.

 

Abstract: As cited in Eber and Parker (2007), “the use of Bloom’s Taxonomy (Bloom, Engelhart, Furst, Hiss, & Krathwohl, 1956) has been shown to enhance student mastery of skills and concepts and critical thinking (Bissell & Lemons, 2006). This session will take participants on a “Blitz” through Bloom’s six levels, reviewing possible assessment questions for each level, as well as provide suggestions for an active learning technique per level that any faculty member can use in any discipline. Each active learning technique will be an “intentionally designed educational activity” that help students succeed (Major, Harris, & Zakrajsek, 2015).

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Recall the six levels of Bloom’s taxonomy. (2) Identify an active learning technique to assess students at each level of Bloom’s. (3) Apply a discipline specific topic to each of the active learning techniques provided.

 

Track/Theme: Engaging/Motivating Students, Preparing Future Faculty

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The Power of PechaKucha: Reimagining Presentations

Stacey Souther - Cuyahoga Community College

 

Reimagine your lecture with PechaKucha (PK), a presentation style in which 20 slides are shown for 20 seconds each (6 minutes 40 seconds in total).

 

Abstract: Reimagine your lecture with PechaKucha (PK), a presentation style in which 20 slides are shown for 20 seconds each (6 minutes and 40 seconds in total). Japanese for “chit-chat”, this automatically progressing PowerPoint presentation allows you to quickly introduce topics with a mini-lecture to free up class time for more active learning and group activities. This workshop will introduce you to PK and will provide tips on how to develop a PK presentation for your classroom. You’ll also get quick tips on teaching students to utilize this style in their classroom presentations!

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Explain the basic proponents of PechaKucha. (2) Determine the steps necessary to develop a PechaKucha presentation. (3) Discuss tips for using PechaKucha with students.

 

Track/Theme: Teaching well w/ classroom technologies

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Implementing and Assessing Peer Outreach Programs for Graduate Student Instructors

Marissa Stewart, Monica Anthony, Stanley Maxson, Clara Montague, and Alexandra Shelton - University of Maryland

 

This session discusses the benefits of peer outreach and observation initiatives for graduate student teachers, peer-to-peer professional development, and evaluating programmatic impact.

 

Abstract: What role can graduate students play in helping one another become effective teachers? This interactive presentation will examine the development, implementation, and assessment of outreach workshops and peer observation programs designed for graduate student instructors. Topics will include the need for graduate instructor support programs, the process and benefits of implementing a peer-to-peer model for outreach programs, and how to assess and improve these programs. There will be additional opportunities to discuss the benefits of these types of programs, the lessons that we have learned, and how these programs can be adapted and applied to other institutions.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Share best practices for facilitating outreach programs for graduate student instructors. (2) Recognize the importance of collecting and reflecting on participant and facilitator feedback when planning and carrying out professional development programs. (3) Identify the benefits of peer outreach as a form of professional development and learn how graduate student instructors can support one another

 

Track/Theme: Preparing Future Faculty

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Monitoring Learning with Formative Feedback in Face-to-Face and Digital Classes

Marissa Stewart, Hannah Jardine, and Louisa Nkrumah - University of Maryland, College Park

 

We will discuss the benefits of classroom assessment techniques and identify ways to use these formative feedback tools both in face-to-face and online courses.

 

Abstract: Instructors are often interested in how they can better monitor students’ learning on an ongoing basis and provide students with formative feedback. Formative feedback strategies, such as classroom assessment techniques (or CATs), provide useful ways for instructors and students to monitor and adjust teaching and learning throughout a course. In this workshop, we will introduce a variety of activities that can be easily integrated into face-to-face and online courses, discuss the benefits of integrating CATs and other feedback opportunities in teaching, and work together to develop an activity for your specific teaching context.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Brainstorm benefits of collecting and providing regular feedback in your course(s). (2) Become familiar with and experience a variety of formative feedback activities and classroom assessment techniques that can be used in both face-to-face and online learning environments to monitor learning. (3) Begin planning how to integrate some of these strategies and activities into your own course(s).

 

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Engaging and Motivating Students, Online Learning and Teaching

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Student Engagement Through Academic Service Learning in Higher Education

Rachel Stotts, Nandita Bezbaruah, Yolanda Arauza, Janelle Miedema, and Mike Coquyt - Minnesota State University Moorhead

 

Faculty at Minnesota State University Moorhead have been collectively working to integrate applied knowledge through the use of Academic Service-Learning to college students within their programs.

 

Abstract: The presentation will provide an overview of the experience students have across several disciplines. Social Work, Teaching and Learning, Speech/Language/Hearing Sciences, and American Multicultural Studies collaborated on the project while completing their academic service-learning (ASL) projects. Community engagement is a focus of the university and academic service learning gives students the opportunity to engage in various projects in the community. Survey data gave faculty members insight on students’ academic service-learning experience and it gave students an opportunity to reflect on their experience and relate concepts discussed in class to “real world”. The presentation will give tips and ideas on integrating academic service learning into course material across disciplines

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Interpret our research methodology and consider similar type research at their institutions. (2) Gain an awareness of student perceptions of their involvement in academic service-learning. These perceptions include, but are not limited to real world applications, contributions to community, and coursework. (3) Recognize some facets of our research that will be remedied prior to any future research endeavors.

 

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners, Multiculturalism/Diversity/Inclusion, Service/Experiential Learning

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Appreciation: Are Students Entitled to It?

Nancy Szwydek - Purdue University Global

 

Recognition is something educators can easily communicate in the classroom, but appreciation is something that has typically been used in the workplace and not in the classroom. This presentation will explore the value of appreciation in facilitating motivation, engagement, and success.

 

Abstract: Great leaders recognize that employees feel value in the workplace when they are appreciated. Considering that students may view education as work, it should then be considered that they should be the benefactors of appreciation. Gary Chapman and Paul White have identified five languages of appreciation in the workplace. This information will be shared to explore how they can be used effectively in the classroom with a goal of enhancing student engagement and motivation, as well as facilitating success in the course and the designated program of study. Additionally, the differentiating factors between recognition and appreciation will be discussed.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify various languages of appreciation. (2) Identify the key differences between recognition and appreciation. (3) Explore methods to demonstrate appreciation

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Engaging and Motivating Students

 

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Faculty Learning on the Move: A Mobile-Based Community of Practice

Maylyn Tan - Singapore Institute of Management Global Education

 

This session describes how the design and facilitation of a mobile-based community of practice (CoP), using the task model approach, support faculty professional learning.

 

Abstract: Situated learning and meaningful academic socialization are key factors to facilitate instructional change (Bickerstaff & Cormier, 2015; Korthagen, 2016). By extending these supportive experiences into the mobile technology environment, faculty members’ access to contextually relevant pedagogical resources and peer support is no longer restricted to in-person professional learning participation. This presentation discusses the design of a mobile-based CoP following the task model approach (Sharples, Taylor, & Vavoula 2004). Insights drawn from the experience of 49 adjunct faculty offer recommendations for sustaining CoP engagement. Session attendees will also explore the application of the mobile learning framework in their own context.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand the transitionary space embodied in the application of mobile technology. (2) Describe how learning context, learner control, and communication influence mobile learning. (3) Discuss applications of the task model in creating online communities for students and faculty.

 

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners, Faculty Development

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ULD Up! Universal Design for Learning at Penn State

Mary Ann Tobin and Gina Pazzaglia - The Pennsylvania State University

 

Participants will discover and practice core Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles and take away exemplars of UDL course activities in use at Penn State.

 

Abstract: In Fall 2018, Penn State's Schreyer Institute for Teaching Excellence, Student Disability Resources, and World Campus launched a four-week, online course in which participants explored and applied the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to their courses. Discover how a small group of UDLers with varied teaching experience and ed tech expertise worked together to UDL Up Penn State! We’ll also introduce participants to UDL by engaging them in UDL-based activities and share exemplar course activities from “Teach to Reach: Maximizing Learning for All Students” participants.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Define and practice core UDL principles. (2) Locate resources on UDL. (3) Build their own UDL activities based on shared exemplars.

 

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Multiculturalism/Diversity/Inclusion

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Defining and Supporting Teaching Excellence

Jennifer Todd and Tonya Buchan - Colorado State University

 

Many university instructors receive little feedback on teaching beyond student evaluations. Session leaders guide you through a process developed to support and evaluate teaching effectiveness.

 

Abstract: Numerous classroom criteria are foundational to effective teaching. How am I adding value to my students’ learning? How am I helping them to develop content expertise and skills in the courses I am teaching? How am I developing a classroom climate supportive of all students? How does my context and my leadership within the class support students’ motivation? What are my biases? How do I support marginalized students? How do I reflect on and revise my practice? After extensive research into best practices in teaching and learning, we have identified seven essential criteria for effective teaching and, therefore, student learning. The basis for several professional development programs on campus, the developed framework also acts as a starting point for goal-setting and evaluation of teaching.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify strengths and growth areas in their teaching. (2) Determine overlap/interdependence of framework criteria for effective teaching. (3) Share teaching effectiveness tools with colleagues/GTAs at their institution.

 

Track/Theme: Preparing Future Faculty, Defining and Supporting Teaching Excellence

 

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Designing for Tenacity: Help Your Students Stick to It!

Kimberly Van Orman - University at Albany

 

Learn to design experiences in your courses that will help your students develop the skills necessary to continue to work when the going gets rough.

 

Abstract: Many of us find that when our courses get difficult, many students just disengage rather than work harder. To effectively persist in the face of difficulty students need to develop self-regulation skills and have an opportunity to practice them. These skills will help them see mistakes as learning opportunities and help them recognize the value of making multiples attempts at difficult tasks. In this workshop, participants will learn what the research suggests we can do to help these students develop the necessary habits, and will practice strategies for designing our courses to help students develop the skills required for tenacity.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe the research that explains why students sometimes give up when courses get difficult. (2) Describe how they can design experiences in their course that can help students develop the tenacity to keep working when things get hard. (3) Create a plan for adopting what they have learned to their own course.

 

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students

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Effectively Communicating Your Research (for Academic Jobs and Profit!)

Kimberly Van Orman - University at Albany

 

Learn to effectively and succinctly communicate your research to a broad audience for success on the academic job search and in grant applications.

 

Abstract: By the time we’re ready for the academic job market, we know our dissertation research backward and forward, inside and out. That familiarity can stand in the way of clearly explaining why it’s important. However, to be successful on the academic job market we need to be able to do that in a way that communicates to both experts and non-expert members of search committees. In this workshop, we will prepare for writing research statements for the job market by learning techniques for improving the relevant communication skills, which will also help in writing the background explanation for grant proposals.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Receive feedback on their current ability to communicate their research. (2) Describe how to better express the “critical need” for their research project. (3) Develop a thesis for their improved research statement.

 

Track/Theme: Preparing Future Faculty

 

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Student Reflections: Making Assessment Engaging, Thoughtful, and Meaningful

Martreece Watson and Jane Nickerson - Gallaudet University

 

This session focuses on learning-centered reflection which is an important component to include in assessment so students take more control of their own learning processes.

  

Abstract: As educators we want students to learn specific content and focus on their own learning processes. In order for assessment to become more meaningful to students, learning-centered reflection needs to be more routine and automatic. Our students are not used to thinking about their own learning processes so we need to focus on specific ways to make learning-centered reflection an important component of assessment. By engaging our students in reflective practices, we are able to align our praxis to meet their collective academic need, which also challenges students to think critically about their own learning, preparing them for their futures.

  

Learning Outcomes: (1) Discuss ways learning-centered reflection might be beneficial to use in their classes. (2) Discuss ways to make their assignments and assessments more engaging and meaningful for their students. (3) Create assessment questions that focus on learning-centered reflection.

 

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Engaging and Motivating Students, Active Learning Strategies

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Evolution of a Course: Student and Faculty Feedback Guide Change

Kaitlin Wellens - Trinity Washington University

 

This session will explore how student and faculty feedback informed the modification of a new course aimed at increasing belonging in first year science students.

 

Abstract: Students’ sense of belonging and self-identity as a scientist are important factors for retention and academic success in STEM fields. To improve student belonging in STEM, we developed a course focused on building students’ sense of community and exposing students to a diverse set of STEM role models. Now in its second semester, we will discuss what we learned from the first semester the course was taught and how we have modified the course activities and curriculum based off student and faculty feedback. Specific topics include faculty feedback for students, student led discussions, and increasing representation in STEM role models.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Recognize the importance of building community and science identity for student success in STEM. (2) Evaluate what worked well and what could be improved in a new course using student and faculty feedback. (3) Incorporate feedback into the course to try and increase student success.

 

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students

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Better Self-Regulated Learners: Better Researchers

Linda White - LeMoyne-Owen College

 

Learn how self-regulated learning in students may enhance their ability to manage coursework more effectively, retain course content, and improve their research skills.

 

Abstract: An English professor assessed and found that students struggle to retain information presented in the classroom and that it directly, and most often negatively, impacted their ability to conceptualize themes and develop steps for writing research papers. After analysis of students’ performances on a variety of writing assignments and conversations with them regarding their performances, the professor realized that it was necessary to design steps that would improve students’ ability to self-regulate their learning. This presentation will illustrate how redesigning key teaching strategies produced marked improvement in students’ research writing and their ability to reflect on their experiences.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand the concept of a self-regulated learner. (2) Build stronger collaboration between instructor and student. (3) Provide strategies for incorporating important skills needed to enhance students’ ability to master course content and to engage in the classroom environment.

 

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students

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Getting Started with Peer Mentorship: How to AMP Any Course

Alexis Williams - University of Maryland

 

Instructional teams based in peer mentorship can boost active learning. Apply strategies from our Academic Peer Mentor Program (AMP) to support student learning in your course.

 

Abstract: The Academic Peer Mentor Program (AMP) trains select undergraduates to advance the learning outcomes of their fellow students in collaboration with course instructors. Through training and hands-on experience, AMPs learn about the science behind effective teaching, develop skills necessary to support peer performance, and gain a unique perspective as both students and instructional partners.

Undergraduate peer mentorship training has expanded active learning opportunities for instructors across our campus. We will examine several of the unique course profiles made possible through AMPed instructional teams. You will leave equipped with several educator-endorsed methods for AMPing your own course or program.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe specific contributions undergraduate peer mentors can make to effective student learning across disciplines and course composition. (2) Practice peer learning and engagement methods that reflect the Fearless Teaching framework. (3) Plan their own relevant peer-learning applications based on our mentorship program outcomes.

 

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners, Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Leveraging Curiosity, Sociality, and Authenticity to Create Impactful, Student-Led Discussion

Ian Wolf - Louisburg College

 

Utilizing a combination of critical inquiry and small-group discussion strategies, students lead engagement with material and construct their own meaningful learning.

 

Abstract: We know small group discussions can produce significant learning, but what form should they take? How do you get your students ready for them? How do you determine if they were impactful? How do you grade them? Should you grade them? By combining specific critical inquiry strategies, modified small group discussion structures, some preparatory training of your students, and a load of patience/self-control you can see students owning their own education via profound discourse. While I’ll show you examples from my own discipline of English, you will this as a highly transferable instruction method.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Guide students to constructing effective discussion questions. (2) Codify and evaluate student performance of discussions to the purpose of providing feedback and promoting student growth. (3) Modify my system to best suit their own methods and students.

 

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners, Engaging and Motivating Students

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Implementing Curricular Change and Generating Faculty Buy-In with Structured Resources

Liesl Wuest and Bill Wuest - Emory University

 

We’ll review the use of shared resources and practices to support a new curriculum, and how they improve the fidelity of implementation and faculty engagement.

 

Abstract: The Emory Department of Chemistry overhauled its core curriculum and is now in the early stages of implementation. The first five courses of Chemistry Unbound no longer follow traditional text-book introductory courses to chemistry (e.g. gen chem, organic) so all the faculty must unilaterally adopt and implement the new courses, the first two of which have 400-600 students a semester. This session will look at resources and practices that were developed to support this big undertaking, how it has improved the fidelity of implementation, and led to increased engagement from the faculty.

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Discuss what large-scale resources can be implemented to support curricular change. (2) Discuss faculty support practices that can be used to reduce faculty anxiety of the unknown or new, and improve the fidelity of implementation. (3) Discuss common faculty concerns about a new curriculum and consider ways to address them that will be a win-win for all.

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, STEM

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Think Like A Coach And Prepare Students For The Big Game!

Liesl Wuest - Emory University

 

Using active learning and practice, coach you students through a successful season and help them win big on the final!

 

Abstract: This session is designed to challenge educators to think like a coach, and provides a framework to design a course that focuses on student practice and preparing students for long-term success. Throughout the session we will consider the following questions and provide time for thought and personal application. What does it mean to approach teaching like coaching? Class like practice? Exams like games/meets? What methods of “practice” have been proven successful and how do you integrate them into your class? How do you know if your students have won at the end of the season?

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Recognize how to design a course with student practice, engagement and success at its core. (2) Discuss how teaching is like coaching and class is like practice. (3) Summarize what types of activities make the best practice and identify ways to incorporate them into their course design.

 

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students

 

  Round Table Discussions

 

Mentors Matter: Faculty Mentoring Students

Gabriele  Bauer - Villanova University

 

This roundtable considers the centrality of mentoring to student learning and development, outlines mentoring approaches, and invites discussion and reflection on mentoring experiences.

Abstract: Educational research affirms that strong student-faculty interaction contributes significantly to student learning, academic success, and well-being.  How can faculty mentoring support students’ academic and personal growth?  This roundtable will help participants reflect on their own mentoring experiences and consider how these experiences might have shaped their approach to mentoring their students.  We will explore the difference between mentoring, teaching, and advising, discuss characteristics of the mentoring relationship, examine mentoring approaches, and reflect on the role of mentoring in our respective departmental and/or institutional context.  Resources will be distributed.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Reflect on their own mentoring experiences and connect them to their approach to mentoring.. (2) Explore mentoring approaches and consider how to enrich this interpersonal learning opportunity. (3) Consider the role of mentoring in their respective departmental and/or institutional context.

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students

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Going the Extra Mile to Help Underprepared Students Succeed

Regina Bobak - Bloomsburg University of PA

 

There are no universal answers to the challenges of supporting underprepared students in a foundation algebra course. This session discusses best practices in supporting students.

Abstract: This session is designed to engage participants in dialogue about how to support underprepared students without lowering standards and expectations. The discussion will center on instructional strategies to support student learning, improve study skills, and build student confidence in a foundation algebra course.  I will share what has worked well, why it has worked, and what has not worked. We will identify practices that work with underprepared students and the instructor to create a classroom environment where students believe they can succeed, not only in this course but in subsequent courses.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify potential challenges of underprepared students. (2) Incorporate strategies to support underprepared students. (3) Determine strategies that fit their teaching style.

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students

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Promoting Student Engagement Using Authentic Forensic Science Experiments in an Online Course

Julie Breitfelder and Ted Yeshion - Gannon University

 

Learn how a Subject Matter Expert and an Instructional Designer collaborated to design an engaging online course using traditional laboratory experiences to promote student success.

Abstract: Engage your students online!  Learn how an instructional designer and a criminalistics professor collaborated to develop an online forensic science course using a commercial lab kit.  Students blend traditional lab experiences with online discussions, interact with course content, and submit digital images of their final products for assessment and feedback, all of which provide the instructor with evidence of student success. Traditional laboratory experiences combined with online delivery promote independent learning with online collaboration and reflection in a student-centered learning environment. Discussion will include practical ideas to increase engagement in your online course.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Promote independent learning with online collaboration and reflection. (2) Observe evidence of student engagement and success. (3) Combine traditional instruction and resources with online delivery

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students, Online Learning and Teaching

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Sustaining or Initiating Your Faculty Learning Community Program

Milt Cox - Miami University

 

Many colleges and universities have faculty learning communities (FLCs) as part of their development programs. We will discuss your questions about building and sustaining FLCs.

Abstract: Many colleges and universities have faculty learning communities (FLCs) as part of their faculty/educational development programs. Research results about the effectiveness of FLC impact on faculty and staff participants, student learning, and implementation strategies are helpful in designing, implementing, and sustaining FLCs. At our table we will discuss 16 recommendations for building and sustaining FLCs and FLC programs. We will provide opportunities for participants to ask questions about FLCs and meet others who are working with initiating or facilitating FLC Programs on their campuses.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe 16 recommendations for building and sustaining FLC programs. (2) Provide some solutions for questions you have about FLCs. (3) Take home some resources about working with FLCs.

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners, Faculty Development

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Creating a Visionary Course Purpose: What Will Your Students Become?

Susan Eliason - Brigham Young University

 

Develop the first draft of a course purpose statement by creating a vision of what your students may become by the end of a course.

Abstract: During this brief session, participants will create the first draft of a course purpose statement via first-thought writing—an engaging way to access a deep and meaningful vision of what their students may become by the end of a course. Faculty are often surprised by what they learn from the wisdom that emerges from the solar plexus as well as the brain during this brief writing exercise. This vision can prompt not only a defensible, often exhilarating, course purpose, but also concomitant learning outcomes and other elements of a well-designed, well-aligned course of study.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Envision and describe what they want their students to become by the end of a course. (2) Create the first draft of a course purpose statement. (3) Identify two or more learning outcomes to support the course purpose.

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students, Preparing New Faculty

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Ignorance and Intransigence: Using the “Knowledge Illusion” to Encourage Open-Mindedness

Stephen  Finn - United States Military Academy

 

The presenter discusses research findings on the ability of philosophy professors to combat intransigence on controversial beliefs.

Abstract: In this workshop, the presenter shares findings on a classroom research study that attempted to measure philosophy professor’s impact on encouraging open-mindedness in students.  The study relied on an experiment, modelled after those discussed in Sloman and Fernbach’s Knowledge Illusion (Riverhead, 2017), which revealed that people moderated their views after discovering their own "knowledge" in a topic was not justified.  Also, the presenter raises a deeper question about the idea of character development as an educational goal, in contrast to Stanley Fish’s argument that college professors main’ job is simply to introduce students to specific disciplinary knowledge

Learning Outcomes: (1) Become familiar with the results of a classroom research project that attempted to encourage open-mindedness.. (2) Articulate, if only in a preliminary way, the importance of character development for higher education.. (3) Articulate and defend, if only in a preliminary way, one’s opinion on the role of professors on character development.

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning

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Refining Information into a High-Octane Curriculum

Michael Gray - Bob Jones University

 

High-performance learning requires the right fuel. Transition your curriculum from mere information to a high-octane blend of compelling questions and powerful principles.

Abstract: Delivery of information (“content”) dominates many classrooms. Alan Jacobs said, “Information is the enemy of reflective thought”: often deadening and nearly always ephemeral. Imagine instead your students wrestling with the compelling questions at the heart of your discipline. See them demonstrating their understanding of core concepts and principles through their skillful application in problem-solving.

Crude oil contains the components of high-octane fuel—and lots of other things. Refining removes these unhelpful ingredients. This session will help you begin the process of extracting high-value ideas from your information-dense curriculum. Learn how you can build a powerful and persuasive curriculum around them.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Distinguish concepts and principles from inert facts. (2) Articulate compelling questions from their domain. (3) Use central questions to focus and power the learning process.

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign

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Teaching from the Strengths Perspective: Empowering Non-Traditional Students

Castagna Lacet - Bridgewater State University

 

This session discusses the Strengths Perspective as an empowering pedagogical tool for retaining non-traditional students in challenging courses.

Abstract: The Strengths Perspective is a way of knowing that has been a symbol of the social work profession.  This perspective can also serve as a key value in higher education teaching with non-traditional students who may lack confidence in their ability to persist and succeed across academic departments.  In this presentation, participants will learn the six principles of the Strengths Perspective and how each can be applied to foster student success.  Case examples will be analyzed.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify the six principles of the strengths perspective. (2) Apply the strengths principles to a case example. (3) Investigate strategies to incorporate this perspective in their teaching practice.

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students

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What’s in Your Teaching Toolbox? Learning Activities for Any Course

Sal Meyers and Brian Smith - Simpson College and Graceland University

 

Construct your own course-specific teaching toolbox of multi-use activities to engage students or gather information about student learning.

Abstract: A teaching toolbox provides you with a limited array of activities you can use in class to engage students or gather information about student learning. These activities are ones that can be used repeatedly throughout a course such as think/pair/share, buzz groups, or minute papers. Pulling together a course-specific teaching toolbox helps you prepare for class faster, avoid non-interactive lectures, and make good use of class time if you discover you need to come up with an activity during class. Roundtable participants will receive a list of 10 activities and then generate additional ideas from their own experiences.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe three to five learning activities you could use in a given course. (2) Prepare for a class session a little bit faster. (3) Implement a strategy on the fly when you have a little extra time in class or your technology fails.

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Engaging and Motivating Students

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Threshold Concepts Faculty Learning Community: Leveraging Conceptual Knowledge of a Discipline

Tom Mierzwa - University of Maryland, College Park

 

Describes how a Faculty Learning Community identifies threshold concepts as elements of their discipline and translates them into student learning activities.

Abstract: Meyer and Land (2003), described a “threshold concept” as a core explanation that both advances understanding of knowledge and develops ways to advance the learning experience. Academic disciplines contain threshold concepts that, unless students fully understand them, they would face a barrier to deeper learning. In this session, we explore how a Faculty Learning Community addressed challenges of incorporating threshold concepts into undergraduate learning activities across a range of disciplines. The FLC process inventoried threshold concepts from disciplines of participating faculty members, deconstructed those concepts into antecedents and outcomes, and designed learning experiences that incorporate a threshold concept.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Gain an understanding of the operational functionality of a Faculty Learning Community using both face-to-face and online modes. (2) Learn how to inventory a discipline’s threshold concepts. (3) Learn about design considerations for translating a threshold concepts into a learning activity.

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners, Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Instructors ExCEL: From a Faculty Learning Community to Institutional Transformation

Karobi Moitra - Trinity Washington University

 

In this round-table session participants will engage in discussions of how the Instructors ExCEL faculty development program drives curricular change and institutional transformation.

Abstract: The Instructors ExCEL program uses a series of intentionally designed workshops, consultations, training courses & conferences to help the faculty improve-upon their expertise in fostering inclusive learning environments. With this training we have implemented a new inclusive excellence curriculum in the sciences called Undergraduates ExCEL that includes a series of mentoring courses to support students through creating a sense of belonging & community. The uniqueness of our program is that as the faculty improve-upon their expertise and sense of belonging they impart this knowledge to the students through the curriculum to increase the retention of first-generation students entering the sciences.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Access and utilize different resources for faculty development. (2) Apply the principles of Instructors ExCEL to their own faculty development programs. (3) Brainstorm a blueprint for faculty development targeted toward faculty at minority serving institutes.

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners, Multiculturalism/Diversity/Inclusion, Preparing Future Faculty

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Using Structured Dialogue Model (SDM) to Engage and Improve Graduate Students' Learning Outcomes

Comfort Okpala and Amon Okpala - North Carolina A&T State University and Fayetteville State University

 

Structured dialogue model is a strategy that has been successfully implemented in resolving community issues and conflicts. It has also been an effective tool for graduate students' engagement that have resulted in greater learning outcomes.

Abstract: Structured dialogue model is a strategy that has been successfully implemented in resolving community issues and conflicts. It has also been an effective tool in education for improving the learning outcomes of students and students’ engagement. The model is one in which students are restricted with one issue that should be collaboratively resolved. The implementation of this strategy in graduate courses has resulted in a positive way on students’ engagement and communication skills. The implementation of this model requires trust, listening skills, collaborative spirit, collegiality, flexibility, and patience on both students and course facilitator

Learning Outcomes: (1) Learn how to utilize the structured dialogue model to facilitate students engagement. (2) Engage in activities that model the dialogue framework. (3) Walk away with the benefits and challenges of structured dialogue model.

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Assessment, Student Learning, Engaging and Motivating Students

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Integrating Lecture and Laboratory in Anatomy and Physiology: Student Perceptions and Performance Persists Over Three Years

Jessica Peacock - Merrimack College

 

Students often struggle in introductory health science courses. To address this, we adapted and implemented a integrated studio model in our Anatomy and Physiology courses.

Abstract: The authors found 1) positive perceptions of integrating lecture and lab in Anatomy&Physiology persisted from 2015-2018. Students (837) and instructors (56) completed the Student Assessment of Learning Gains survey; perceptions were positive and consistent for both. Narratives identified the ability to immediately apply theoretical knowledge in lab as an important positive attribute in improving student learning.  Authors also concluded 2) student performance rates including unsatisfactory grades [C-, D, F, W] improved during integrated years. Quiz and exam grades were mixed across the integrated semesters despite less in-class time. Collaboration with Kevin Finn Ed.D and Kathy FitzPatrick PhD.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Achieve tangible learning outcomes in gateway courses through a well facilitated pedagogical approach. (2) Understand the application of an integrated studio model as a pedagogical approach for fostering an active learning environment and improving student satisfaction and performance in introductory health science courses. (3) Consider time-effective, contemporary ways to adapt and implement a new pedagogical approach to provide students opportunities to immediately apply knowledge, engage with classroom resources, and facilitate student led discussions.

Track/Theme: Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Content and Empathy: Rigorous Humanity in the Classroom

Nathan Pritts - Ashford University

 

Empathy comes easy when emailing students or in Introductory forums. But discussions of course content can also be charged with empathetic strategies for stronger engagement.

Abstract: We all want motivated and engaged students in the classroom. So we craft pyrotechnic learning experiences with bleeding edge technology. And, somewhere along the way, we forget one important key – we are people, talking to other people. Of all the ways to indicate that topics under discussion are important, we’ve forgotten a lesson even the youngest child knows: we can use our words.

Empathy is our tool for this. It might come easy when emailing students or in Introductory forums. But discussions of course content can also be charged with empathetic, rather than controlling, strategies for stronger engagement.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Recognize interactive points of contact in the online classroom. (2) Identify opportunities for employing empathy in classroom interactions. (3) Develop strategies for employing empathy in classroom interactions.

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Online Learning and Teaching

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Diverse Contributions, Inclusive Curriculum: The Extended Diversity Experience Faculty Model

Charline Rowland - University of Pittsburgh

 

Participants will learn and discuss the stages of the Extended Diversity Experience (EDE) which is a year-long faculty learning community that involves faculty, teaching consultants and librarians.

Abstract: Many higher education institutions are reviewing and assessing ways to bring multiple approaches to their faculty development programs on diversity and inclusion. This session presents a faculty learning community (FLC) model that involves faculty, teaching consultants and librarians at one large urban, public institution in the United States. Using a flowchart, participants will have opportunity to learn about the stages of this faculty development model. Time will be provided for discussion on the model in relations to other diversity/inclusive faculty development efforts at postsecondary institutions.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Discuss how faculty learning communities can create inclusive classrooms. (2) Learn the stages of the Extended Diversity Experience Faculty Development Model. (3) Discuss the challenges and opportunities of model in relations to other diversity/inclusive faculty development efforts.

Track/Theme: Multiculturalism/Diversity/Inclusion, Faculty Development

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Universal Design for Learning

Josh Rumpff, Melissa Dietrich, Melany McNew, and Joseph Tubioli - Harrisburg Area Community College

 

Participants will observe how effective UDL practices impact the classroom and how they can use simple strategies to make similar changes in their own classrooms.

Abstract: In today’s college classrooms, we still struggle with the difference between accessibility and Universal Design for Learning (UDL). Universal Design is not simply presenting content that all learners can use, which is how accessibility is often described. Instead, UDL entails “designing courses with ‘space’ for individuals to co-construct their learning opportunities and processes.” (Chandler, Zaloudek, and Carlson). The three key areas of UDL are representation, engagement, and action and expression. Representation involves the various modes of content delivery that are utilized. Engagement includes how the students get and remain motivated in the course. Action and expression is how the student can measurably demonstrate that he/she has met the outcome. During this presentation, we will cover the three main areas of UDL and offer multiple examples and best practices for each.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify the 3 main networks of UDL. (2) Discuss the difference between accessibility and UDL. (3) Apply basic UDL principles.

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Engaging and Motivating Students, Multiculturalism/Diversity/Inclusion

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"The Only Constant Is Change": Teaching Success In Real Life

Karen Schramm - Delaware Valley University

 

According to experts, today's students will change jobs eight to 10 times by age 38. What, therefore, should we teach them? Here's what to do.

Abstract: According to experts, today's students will change jobs eight to 10 times by age 38. That statistic should make all teachers reconsider what they are teaching their students, and how.

Teachers are focused on imparting the facts. But virtually every bit of information known to humanity is available, literally at one's fingertips, 24/7, thanks to technology, so what can we reasonably hope to add? How can we ensure students' success, not just in classrooms, but as they navigate life itself? Drawing upon neuro-research and diverse disciplinary approaches, this session presents a creative method for inculcating success In Real Life.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Maintain their students' engagement. (2) Help their students learn more effectively. (3) Help them apply key life lessons and soft skills In Real Life.

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Teaching: The Courage of Vulnerability

Ester  Sesmero - Montgomery College

 

Why do we believe that to keep our authority we need to pretend we know everything? making yourself vulnerable helps build empathy with your students and increases success rate!

Abstract: Why is it an extended belief that to show our feelings is not professional? Why do we believe that, as a professor, to maintain our authority we need to pretend that we know everything? In this round-table I would like to discuss about how making yourself vulnerable and showing yourself to your students the way you are, with your strengths and your weaknesses, helps build empathy with your students what results into them discovering that if you were able to do it, they can succeed in your class too! What will increase student retention and success in your course!

Learning Outcomes: (1) Feel comfortable sharing your own experiences with your students as a means to build empathy. (2) Recognize failures as prime opportunities for learning and convey them as such to your students. (3) Acknowledge that you do not need to pretend you know everything to maintain your authority in your class

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Engaging and Motivating Students

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Valuable or Just Plain Distracting: Social Media As A Learning Tool

Thomasena Shaw - Bridgewater State University

 

This presentation highlights research findings related to use of social media (Twitter, LinkedIn) as a pedagogical tool in the classroom, identifies opportunities/challenges, showcases best practices.

Abstract: Research indicates that the strategic use of social media (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) in the college classroom has the potential to significantly improve the student learning experience. However, despite the obvious advantages research indicates that faculty and students are not using the technology in a way that maximizes personal branding opportunities OR the needs of potential employers. This session highlights study findings that identify gaps between student and faculty perceptions of the use of social media in the classroom, identifies the opportunities and challenges of the pedagogical tool, and showcases best practices for its use in a more strategic way

Learning Outcomes: (1) Examine research findings on gaps that exist between faculty and student perceptions of the usefulness of social media as a learning tool in the classroom. (2) Identify the pedagogical benefits of engaging students using social media as a learning tool in the classroom. (3) Evaluate best practice strategies to maximize personal branding opportunities and strategic use of social media in the classroom for students.

Track/Theme: Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Online Learning and Teaching, Teaching Well with Classroom Technologies

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Valuable or Just Plain Distracting: Social Media As A Learning Tool

Thomasena Shaw - Bridgewater State University

 

This presentation highlights research findings related to use of social media (Twitter, LinkedIn) as a pedagogical tool in the classroom, identifies opportunities/challenges, showcases best practices.

Abstract: Research indicates that the strategic use of social media (e.g. Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) in the college classroom has the potential to significantly improve the student learning experience. However, despite the obvious advantages research indicates that faculty and students are not using the technology in a way that maximizes personal branding opportunities OR the needs of potential employers. This session highlights study findings that identify gaps between student and faculty perceptions of the use of social media in the classroom, identifies the opportunities and challenges of the pedagogical tool, and showcases best practices for its use in a more strategic way

Learning Outcomes: (1) Examine research findings on gaps that exist between faculty and student perceptions of the usefulness of social media as a learning tool in the classroom. (2) Identify the pedagogical benefits of engaging students using social media as a learning tool in the classroom. (3) Evaluate best practice strategies to maximize personal branding opportunities and strategic use of social media in the classroom for students.

Track/Theme: Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Online Learning and Teaching, Teaching Well with Classroom Technologies

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Engaging and Motivating Students in an Online Course

Sharmila Sivalingam - Maryville University

 

Learn how to engage and keep your online students motivated throughout the 8 weeks course Also, learn how to support your online students.

Abstract: This presentation explains how to keep the online students engaged in the course during an eight-week term. Ideas on how to keep your students motivated by applying simple strategies will be discussed. The changes made in an online course and why it was necessary to make those changes and what are the results will be presented.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Discuss the challenges related to teaching an online course and how to address them. (2) Strategies to engage and motivate online students in an eight-week course will be analyzed. (3) Best practices to support online students will be examined.

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students, Online Learning and Teaching

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The Importance of Quality Faculty Development for Adjuncts

Stacey Souther -Cuyahoga Community College

 

Using data from a recent survey, this roundtable session will discuss the availability of and development of quality faculty development for adjunct faculty.

Abstract: Adjunct faculty are the backbone to many colleges and universities, yet often may not be made a priority on campus for quality faculty development. Using data from a recent survey on adjunct faculty development from institutions around the country, this roundtable session will discuss different types of programming available to adjuncts, what is missing for adjuncts, and what institutions can do to develop meaningful programs for adjuncts. We will also discuss how we can help adjuncts participate more fully in available faculty development programs.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Summarize recent survey data on adjunct faculty development programming. (2) Discuss what institutions can do to develop meaningful faculty development programing for adjuncts. (3) Explain possible techniques to increase adjunct participation in faculty development programs.

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Engaging Graduate Students in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning through Faculty-Student Partnerships

Laura Sponsler - University of Denver

 

This roundtable session will share strategies, pedagogies, and examples of how to engage graduate students in SoTL (The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning).

Abstract: This roundtable session shares the results of a study of a two-yearlong process and study engaging graduate students in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) through a faculty-student partnership model.  Students participated in a curricular audit, assessment, curricular redesign, and the design of a reflective ePortfolio as a culminating educational experience.  This session highlights the processes and structures to engage graduate students in student-faculty partnerships and begin their journey as educators and future leaders of SoTL.  Participants will have the opportunity to reflect on their own engagement with graduate students and curricular redesign and plan for ways to engage students in SoTL.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Review literature around faculty-student partnerships. (2) Review this study’s findings and implications for graduate student engagement in SoTL. (3) Compare their own practices and experiences with curricular redesign with those of the framework of student-faculty partnerships.

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Creating Communities of Learners, Engaging and Motivating Students

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Leveraging Authentic Assessment and Reflective Practice to Foster Meta-Cognition

Tyan Thomas and Jane Bowen - University of the Sciences

 

This session focuses on use of authentic assessment and reflection to enhance student learning and targets attendees who want students to think beyond the grade.

Abstract: We describe authentic assessments created in a doctor of pharmacy curriculum simulate real-world situations students may encounter in professional practice. These “extrinsic summative assessment reassessments” (ESARs) are programmatic assessments, not tied to a course or grade, and take place at the midpoint and/or end of each semester. ESARs require students to integrate and apply knowledge and skills acquired from previous courses and are followed by reflection sessions where students are prompted to self-assess their performance.  We will share our process in developing ESARs, our observations and reflections on students’ reactions to the process, and student reflections suggestive of meta-cognition.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Describe the elements of an authentic, extra-course assessment. (2) Design an authentic assessment that leads to meaningful data related to real-time knowledge, skills, and attitudes developed in his/her course. (3) Discuss the impact authentic assessment coupled with reflection may have on deeper learning and meta-cognition.

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students

 

  Poster Presentations

 

College Student Bereavement: What We Know About What They Need

Kathy Bailey - Bridgewater State University

 

College student bereavement is largely unconsidered, yet faculty on college campuses frequently encounter students experiencing loss. This poster will address current empirical knowledge.

Abstract: Investigation into college student bereavement over the past 40 years has been, at best, minimal. Studies completed have consistently placed the incidence and prevalence of college student bereavement within the last 24 months between 22% and 50%.  College campuses are unique environments when considering this issue and have been found to be isolating and lonely places for students experiencing loss. This poster will address incidence and prevalence, coping skills, and interventions found to be effective for grieving students.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Have specific knowledge of incidence and prevalence of bereaved college students. (2) Understand the empirical evidence of students coping skills. (3) Gain new perspectives on how to intervene with college students experiencing bereavement

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Engaging and Motivating Students

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Model and Rubrics for ObjectiveFaculty Performance Reviews

Julie Becker and Phyllis  Blumberg - University of the Sciences

 

This model states criteria for evaluating teaching, research, service and leadership.  It recommends different expectation standards for faculty depending on rank and type of appointment.

Abstract: This poster will explain a new, literature -supported model for evaluating faculty and the associated rubrics that assess faculty within four domains: teaching, research, service, and leadership. The model explains how the expected standards for each component could vary by rank, type of appointment (teaching or research track or tenure versus non-tenure) and years of service as a faculty member. The weight of these four domains varies by institution and can be accordingly scaled to its values. These rubrics can be used for self-assessment, assessment by supervisors for performance review, or a review committee for promotion and tenure.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify weaknesses in current faculty evaluation systems as discussed in the literature and use the model to suggest improvements. (2) Discuss considerations for evaluating research, service and leadership. (3) Use rubrics to determine effectiveness of teaching either of their teaching or to evaluate other faculty

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Evaluation of teaching

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Improving Student Learning using 3-D Printed Models of Proteins in the Classroom

Jared Bowden - Brigham Young Univeristy, Idaho

 

3D printing was utilized to print protein structures to analyze whether models enhance understanding of protein structure and function among biochemistry students in the classroom.

Abstract: Physical three-dimensional protein models were used in the classroom to increase student understanding of concepts surrounding structure and function of proteins. Comparisons between computer visualization software commonly employed to teach these concepts and physical models demonstrate increased learning gains in standardized assessment questions.  This research suggests that tactile and physical learning tools aid in improving understanding.  Learning gains were measured for both short and long term retention for student comparison groups.  Our data suggests that active learning activities involving physical senses may assist in deepening understanding and retention of key concepts.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Clearly delineate the value of learning activities involving multiple sensory techniques. (2) Gain insights into proper group based activity design. (3) Explore outcome based question design.

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, STEM

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Promoting Student Engagement Using Authentic Forensic Science Experiments in an Online Course

Julie Breitfelder and Ted Yeshion - Gannon University

 

Learn how a Subject Matter Expert and an Instructional Designer collaborated to design an engaging online course using traditional laboratory experiences to promote student success.

Abstract: Engage your students online!  Learn how an instructional designer and a criminalistics professor collaborated to develop an online forensic science course using a commercial lab kit.  Students blend traditional lab experiences with online discussions, interact with course content, and submit digital images of their final products for assessment and feedback, all of which provide the instructor with evidence of student success. Traditional laboratory experiences combined with online delivery promote independent learning with online collaboration and reflection in a student-centered learning environment. Discussion will include practical ideas to increase engagement in your online course.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Promote independent learning with online collaboration and reflection. (2) Observe evidence of student engagement and success. (3) Combine traditional instruction and resources with online delivery

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students, Online Learning and Teaching

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Empowering Students Through Student Directed Learning and Assessment

Erin Carriere-Kretschmer - Trinity Washington University

 

A first look at data concerning involving students in course content decisions and self-evaluation on student engagement and learning.

Abstract: Today, it seems, many undergraduates are taking classes toward a degree they believe they need for their financial future but for which they are otherwise uninterested.  Approaching a degree as an outcome to be achieved as opposed to a process in which to engage, is problematic and has implications for, among other things, content and process-based learning outcomes.  Are literature circles, student self-assessments and engagement in content-based course decisions effective tools for driving student engagement levels and content-based learning outcomes?  Initial answers to this question will be offered through an analysis of data collected during the 2018-2019 academic year.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand the role of self-assessment in empowering student engagement and content-based learning. (2) Understand the role of literature circles in empowering students and student content-based learning outcomes. (3) Understand some of the problems associated with using literature circles and student self-assessment tools for the sake of driving engagement and content-based learning outcomes.

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students

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Improving Patient Care by Utilizing an Evidenced-based Education to Reduce Seclusion

Ifeoma Dunn - University of Michigan Flint

 

The need to promote the safety of nurses and patients cannot be overemphasized. The use of seclusion as a measure to manage aggression is increasing in psychiatric units and does not promote safety. TeamSTEPPS is an evidenced-based program that helps to promote safety.

Abstract: The need to promote the safety of nurses and patients cannot be overemphasized. The use of seclusion as a measure to manage aggression is increasing in psychiatric units and does not promote safety. The use of seclusion is controversial and has been deemed an encroachment on human right and dignity which can cause psychological trauma, physical injury, deterioration of illness, long hospitalization stay, increase readmission rate and death. This quality improvement project utilized a quasi-experimental design for the project. The project employed the TeamSTEPPS evidenced-based program to help inform nurses about verbal de-escalation which helps to reduce seclusion and patients aggressive behavior. The research utilized a quantitative method to collect data pre- and post-test. Result shows that TeamSTEPPS program is effective in reducing seclusion and aggression. Thus, promoting safety.

Learning Outcomes: (1) A change in nurses’ behavior from the usage of seclusion to utilizing verbal de-escalation to reduce seclusion that was seen in seclusion. (2) Decrease in patients’ aggressive behavior. (3) Promotion of staff and patients safety.

Track/Theme: Innovative Pedagogical Approaches,Multiculturalism/Diversity/Inclusion, Safety

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Building Professional Confidence: Outcomes of Internship Career and Networking Event

Kathleen Gould - Towson University

 

Community Health students shared internship projects at a career and networking event with fellow students and professionals. Evaluations addressing student confidence and performance are presented.

Abstract: Community Health Education students are required to complete an internship in a community setting in the last semester of their undergraduate program. Students work with site supervisors to identify tasks and projects that will build their expertise and develop confidence in their professional skills. The ability to confidently discuss accomplishments is often identified as an area of weakness for students. A career and networking event provided students with the opportunity to present an internship project to peers and health professionals. Understanding outcomes of this event will assist attendees in identifying similar events within their disciplines to build professional confidence.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand the nature of the Career and Networking Event. (2) State the goals of the event and the outcomes experienced by students and professionals. (3) Conceptualize similar events that could benefit students in their disciplines

Track/Theme: Service/Experiential Learning

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Student Engagement Through Yoga Pants & Bong Hits 4 Jesus

John Hebert - Anoka-Ramsey Community College

 

Study results revealed role-playing as an advocate in a classroom debate impacts a students’ perceptions of engagement in learning.

Abstract: Research has shown that the student’s self-perception of engagement can impact the student’s actual engagement in the classroom, where the instructor has the most control over the learning process. The primary purpose of the study was to investigate whether role-playing at special events measurably affects a student’s perception of their own engagement in that learning process.

The research design consisted of a mixed method study with approximately 100 students enrolled in political science courses.

Going forward, the investigator will continue the study and assess whether “higher-risk” students are sharing in that perception of engagement.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify opportunities to assess student engagement in classroom activities. (2) Create additional activities to further student engagement in the classroom. (3) Evaluate the effectiveness of those activities in real time.

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Engaging and Motivating Students

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Using Engaged In-Class Practice Problems in a Gateway Accounting Course

Duanping Hong - Kennesaw State University

 

Engaged in-class group practice problems are used in an introductory accounting course in a large public R2 university. Effectiveness of this intervention is examined.

Abstract: This study examines the effectiveness of an intervention used in the teaching of an introductory level accounting course in a large public R2 university. A large fraction of students in the introductory level accounting courses will not choose accounting as their major and therefore have lower motivation in learning. In addition, students in this type of schools often have additional constraints on their available time out of class. These factors give rise to unsatisfactory results in students’ learning and assessment performance. In the intervention, the instructor allocates class time to allow students to work in groups on practice problems related to certain learning outcomes and to earn bonus points by submitting correct answers. Such intervention is implemented to different extents in two sections of the same course. This study provides evidence on the effectiveness of a potential solution for problems commonly faced by instructors of gateway-to-completion courses with less motivated students.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand the challenges of teaching a gateway course for less motivated students. (2) Learn the effectiveness of the intervention used in this study. (3) Learn how to use a similar intervention in their own teaching.

Track/Theme: Academic Success, Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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It's Not Enough to Know Where the Library is...

Austina Jordan - University of North Georgia

 

Literature review of student success and library use and engagement.

Abstract: If you work on a university campus student retention comes up in your department meetings, senate meetings, in admissions updates, and countless other places of conversation, formally and informally. Students who are successful in the classroom are retained at a much higher rate than their peers who are struggling academically. Our institutions spend a lot of resources finding new creative ways to move students towards success. Not all retention goals and strategies are necessarily new, sometimes they are right in front of us. Libraries are an obvious existing place where both people and resources are available to help students achieve their goal of success. This literature review shows the various ways libraries are already working to help student achieve success and demonstrates that student success and library engagement are a natural partnership in any college community.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Identify how library use effects student success. (2) Understand new ways for their students to utilize library resources to help them be successful students. (3)Gain new insights into how they can integrate the library into their students classroom experience.

Track/Theme: Academic Success

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Taking Students Outside of Their Comfort Zones

Molly Marnella - Bloomsburg University

 

An urban class experience for upper-level rural undergraduate students in which a pre and a post surveys were given to see feelings about the experience.

Abstract: This presentation will show through quantitative and qualitative data on how upper level students started feeling uncomfortable in an urban education experience but by the end of the two weeks, the majority of the students wanted to live and teach there.

Learning Outcomes: (1) See the data on how the students became comfortable at the end of the experience. (2) See the reflections given during their experience. (3) See the steps in setting up this outside of the classroom experience.

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners

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Theory-Practice Chasm: Translating the Anatomy of Scholarly Articles for Practice Implications

Tom Mierzwa - University of Maryland, College Park

 

This poster presents an exercise that dissects an article’s anatomy and identifies aspects that can be translated for practical knowledge applicable in a workplace environment.

Abstract: Understanding workplace practice implications provide a strengthened learning experience for undergraduate students who typically lack real-world work experience to frame their learning. Framed within an interpretation of Pasteur’s Quadrant, where knowledge rigor is balanced against practical relevance, this poster portrays how interpreting the anatomy of a scholarly article reveals a durable practice learning experience for undergraduate students.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Gain an understanding of how theory and learned knowledge from a scholarly article can be interpreted for its practice implications. (2) Relate how practice-based learning fits into Bloom’s Taxonomy and the SOLO Taxonomy. (3) Identify resources and an on-going community of interest in practice-based learning activities.

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Designing a Practical Application Opportunity to Enhance Professional Development

Jennifer Moxley - Towson University

 

This presentation will focus on how to effectively design a professional development opportunity for students in a practical skills course.

Abstract: Students in practical skills courses blend content knowledge and practical application in order to thoroughly examine theory and methodology.  Classroom activities can provide opportunities for skill development through active engagement with classmates.  However, opportunities for students to practice skills on individuals other than their classmates provide valuable professional development experiences.  This presentation will provide an example of how a practical application opportunity is used for professional development in an undergraduate exercise science practical skills course.  In addition, the model used to create this opportunity will be highlighted and examples of implementation strategies will be discussed.  (Collaboration with Andrea Barton, M.S.)

Learning Outcomes: (1) Discuss how a practical application opportunity can be used for professional development in a practical skills course. (2) Develop an organized model for creating professional development opportunities. (3) Implement creative strategies for professional development opportunities in practical skills courses

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students, Service/Experiential Learning

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Consulting the Experts: Creating Connections By Reporting on Informational Interviews

Pamela Poe - University of the Sciences

 

By requiring an "Expert Interview" assignment, including sharing results from one informational interview in class, each student extends their network with valuable information about future opportunities.

Abstract: A four-step process of incorporating informational interviews into course content begins with identification and description of the specific assignment. Second, a training process for students in class combines the development of high-quality, open-ended qualitative questions. Once 5 to 10 good questions have been prepared, along with a brief contact script and review of interview “etiquette”, students are invited to discuss their top three choices of interview candidates. Finally, the fourth step consists of a summary report that is a prepared response to the interview experience, with a required briefing in class.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Design and implement a creative exercise to help students extend their professional network. (2) Discuss and apply good qualitative in-depth interview questioning strategies. (3) Envision ways to encourage students to offer impromptu public speaking briefings, engage with peers and share qualitative research findings.

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners, Engaging and Motivating Students

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Changing Stress Mindset to Enhance Academic Performance

Amanda  Price - Pennsylvania College of Health Sciences

 

The way we think about stress matters. We share encouraging evidence that brief messages on the positive power of stress can enhance students’ academic performance.

Abstract: In this session we will explore the nature of stress, its impact on our performance and the impact of our stress mindset. Often, educators and academic support specialists emphasize the need to prevent and manage stress, emphasizing a mindset that stress must be minimized to ensure positive well-being. Emerging evidence suggests this well intentioned message may hamper students’ performance. In this presentation, we will review our findings suggesting that brief messages on the beneficial effects of stress, delivered through an online learning management system, can improve students’ stress mindset and their academic performance.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Explain the role of stress mindset in shaping our response to stressful events. (2) Explain the impact that brief messages on the beneficial nature of stress can have on stressful academic tasks. (3) Develop methods for introducing positive message about stress into course delivery and other communication with students.

Track/Theme: Academic Success

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Visionboards: A Key Piece to Building Community

Mia Ray - Trinity Washington University

 

It is important for undergraduates to build a sense of belonging early on in their collegiate career. Visionboards are one way to do just that.

Abstract: STEM faculty at Trinity Washington University are committed to improving a sense of belonging, inclusion and community in our undergraduate students.  One way that we do this is by using the creation of visionboards to help them visualize their goals and aspirations.  This activity has been found to be the most influential assignment in our Mentor Moment 1 course and provides an opportunity for our students to share their dreams with one another. This has lead to the elimination of barriers for many, allowing them to find common ground.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand the importance of community to undergraduate students. (2) Understand the importance of  belonging and inclusion to undergraduate students. (3) Create visionboards.

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students

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Promoting Teamwork in Undergraduate Medical Education with the Zoom Activty

Carlos Rodriguez and Dimitrios Papanagnou - Thomas Jefferson University

 

Application of the Zoom activity as a team-building and communication fostering exercise in undergraduate medical education during orientation

Abstract: Team building and leadership are two critical features in running a safe healthcare system, however, there is still a great demand for formal leadership training. 260 first-year medical students were enrolled in a repurposed Zoom Team Building Activity as part of their orientation where each team must organize a set of sequential images, each of which contains a “zoomed out” section from the previous image, into the correct order within 30 minutes. Facilitators noted that the first-year medical students exemplified friendly and respectful intercollegiate skills, but were less adept in selecting leaders, assigning roles, and preparing for the activity challenges.

This work was co-authored by: Xiao Chi  Zhang

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Introduce the Zoom game as a team-building and communication fostering exercise in undergraduate medical education. (2) Assess baseline teamwork skills of first year medical student through immersive gaming experience. (3) Explore gamification as a novel teaching tool for adult learners in medical education

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students, Teaching Well with Classroom Technologies

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A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Emergency Medicine Residents’ Preferred Listening Styles

Carlos Rodriguez and Dimitrios Papanagnou - Thomas Jefferson University

 

Application of the Personal Listening Profile as tool to assess trends in listening style across year of training in Emergency Medicine residents.

Abstract: Listening skills are quintessential for the practice of effective patient care. Emergency Medicine (EM) trainees are rarely encouraged to reflect on their preferred listening styles. Post-graduate year (PGY) 1-3 EM residents attending a regional EM joint conference completed the Personal Listening Profile assessment that categorizes listening preferences across 5 categories: appreciative, comprehensive, discerning, empathic, and evaluative. Fifty-four residents participated in the exercise. Highest-scoring listening approaches were appreciative and comprehensive.  Discerning listening increased respectively as PGY increased; empathic listening decreased over PGY training.  Female EM residents demonstrated higher empathy scores while male EM residents scored higher evaluative scores.

This work was co-authored by: Xiao Chi  Zhang

 

Learning Outcomes: (1) Applying Personal Listening Profile (PLP) as a tool for EM residents to reflect on their preferred listening styles. (2) Define patterns in preferred listening style in EM residents. (3) Identify potential trends in listening style across year of training

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Engaging and Motivating Students, Multiculturalism/Diversity/Inclusion

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Building a Competency-Based Education Startup on Your Campus

Christopher Sessums - D2L Ltd.

 

This session explores the strategies of a lean startup approach, how to apply them to higher education, and how to build a competency-based education (CBE) startup on campus.

Abstract: Building an effective business is an organizational management issue. It involves multiple forms of planning, coordination, processes, and restraint. This session explores the strategies of a lean startup approach, how to apply them to a higher education setting, and how to build a competency-based education (CBE) startup on your campus.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Review the lean startup business methodology. (2) Examine and respond to prompts associated with a business case study. (3) Assess and report on strategies and tactics that could best support a new online CBE program

Track/Theme: Course/Curriculum Design/Redesign, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Online Learning and Teaching

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Using Reflective Writing to Assess Integrative Learning in Programming Courses

Jeffrey Stone - Penn State University

 

This presentation will discuss the use of reflective writing assignments to assess the impact of sustainability-themed programming projects in introductory Computer and Information Science courses.

Abstract: This session will discuss using reflective writing to assess the impact of sustainability-themed computer programming projects. These projects were intended to promote students’ understanding of sustainability concepts, awareness of sustainability applications in their own communities, and appreciation for the social applicability of programming, as well as to influence changes in student behavior. Reflective writing was used as the means by which students communicated the impact of these projects and by which the desired integrative learning outcomes were assessed. This session will provide attendees with opportunities to explore ways reflection can be used in their own courses to asses integrative learning.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand the benefits and limitations of using reflective writing for assessing integrative student learning. (2) Understand potential applications of reflection to assess integrative learning in nontraditional disciplines. (3) Apply the lessons learned in their own integrative learning courses.

Track/Theme: Assessment, Student Learning, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Incorporating Interprofessional Collaboration into Team Decision-Making

Deborah Summers and Laura Finn - University of the Sciences

 

Incorporating opportunities for team decision-making into Interprofessional Education is challenging. Poster describes innovative strategies to improve communication and build confidence in teamwork and using guidelines.

Abstract: Team-based decision-making between students of different healthcare professions is challenging to incorporate into the classroom. Students have limited opportunities to develop understanding of the other profession’s role and for team communication with simulated caregivers. Faculty implemented novel strategies to simulate geriatric healthcare teams with caregiver communication, allowing students of different professions to utilize medication and fall prevention criteria to develop common care plans.  Students reported increased understanding of the other professions’ decision-making approach and greater confidence using medication appropriateness criteria. Strategies are applicable to other disciplines utilizing teamwork to enhance decision-making skills and broaden understanding, confidence and empathy.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Implement strategies to motivate learners from different programs to share their approach to problem-solving and decision-making. (2) Overcome the challenges of organizing team-based interprofessional education (IPE) activities. (3) Utilize interprofessional team simulation to develop confidence in communication skills.

Track/Theme: Creating Communities of Learners, Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches

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Using Standardized Patients to Enhance Student Learning Outcomes in Geriatrics

Shaun Varrecchia - University of the Sciences

 

This study compares simulated versus actual patient encounters to teach communication skills necessary for working with older adults with cognitive impairment to students.

Abstract: Working with individuals with cognitive impairment can be an uncomfortable experience for budding clinicians without the necessary skills. Exposing students to this population under the guidance of a practicing clinician is one strategy that can be used to increase comfort and improve skills but relying on outside facilities introduces variability that can negatively affect outcomes. We recreated this experience using standardized patients (SPs). Student feedback and reflections showed that SPs created a realistic patient interaction while improving outcomes.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Discuss the faculty/program benefits of standardized patient encounters. (2) Understand the student’s perceived benefits of a standardized patient experience. (3) Discuss considerations for modifying experiences from actual to standardized patient encounters.

Track/Theme: Engaging and Motivating Students, Innovative Pedagogical Approaches, Service/Experiential Learning

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Impact of Concussion on the Collegiate Student: Classroom Implications

Elizabeth  Wescott, Barbara Nadeau, and Salvador  Bondoc - Quinnipiac University

 

This presentation explores the impact of concussion on collegiate students, their academics and campus life and how we as faculty can provide support for success.

Abstract: Although often associated with sports, college students sustain concussions from motor vehicle accidents, falls, and assaults. A concussion can cause acute changes in emotion and functioning including headache, visual disturbance, dizziness, nausea, and cognitive slowing. These symptoms whether resolving in a few days to weeks or persisting for months can greatly disrupt academic life causing disengagement or poor performance. Lingering symptoms of concussion and impact on participation in academic life will be identified and innovative approaches for development of supports, such as coping skills, that directly address barriers to performance for students in the management of concussion will be provided.

Learning Outcomes: (1) Understand and recognize potential lingering symptoms of concussion and the impact these symptoms can have on quality of life, academic performance and campus life. (2) Identify coping strategies and skills that can be used to address post-concussion symptoms. (3) Identify innovative approaches for development of supports that directly address barriers to performance for students suffering from post-concussion symptoms.

Track/Theme: Academic Success

 
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